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Next Up: Brideshead Revisited

Hello again, Evelyn Waugh.

I last read Mr. Waugh’s (yes, Evelyn is a guy) work when I tackled my 49th book from the list, A Handful of Dust, which is also currently ranked #19 in my rankings.

Now it’s time to dive into Brideshead Revisited, a novel which some critics say was his best effort.

A few facts about Brideshead Revisited and Evelyn Waugh:

  • The novel was first published in 1945.
  • Waugh said Brideshead Revisited “deals with what is theologically termed ‘the operation of Grace,’ that is to say, the unmerited and unilateral act of love by which God continually calls soul to Himself.”
  • He once called the novel his magnum opus, but later told Graham Green he was “appalled” after re-reading it.
  • Brideshead has appeared on many top 100 lists, including the Modern Library, Time, the BBC, and Newsweek.
  • A film adaption of the novel, starring Emma Thompson, was released in 2008.
  • Waugh was a traditional Catholic, which contributed to many Catholic themes in his work.
  • He passed away in 1966 at the age of 62.

I’ve heard nothing but good things about Brideshead Revisited, so I’m excited to get going on this novel.

Have you read it? Your thoughts?

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11 Comments Post a comment
  1. Reblogged this on oshriradhekrishnabole.

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    April 23, 2015
  2. trailingmrs #

    I absolutely love love love this book – one of my favourites ever! I hadn’t read anything by Evelyn Waugh before (thanks for clearing up the gender by the way!) and was a little unmotivated within the first hundred pages, then for me it suddenly took off and I couldn’t put it down. I’m sort of jealous that you’re getting to read it for the first time. Enjoy!

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    April 23, 2015
  3. Just an unrelated note: Evelyn Waugh’s first wife was also named Evelyn. According to Wikipedia, “Among their friends they quickly became known as ‘He-Evelyn’ and ‘She-Evelyn”‘. (Although I would have thought ‘hevelyn’ & ‘shevelyn’ would have been more likely.)

    Liked by 2 people

    April 23, 2015
  4. Now on my reading list

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    April 23, 2015
  5. Yes! I’ve been waiting for you to do this one for a while now. One of my favorite books.

    Although I haven’t seen the Emma Thompson adaptation, there was a mini-series of it done starring Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews in the lead parts, with even John Gielgud and Laurence Olivier in supporting roles. You might want to look into it maybe.

    Anyway, I can’t wait to see what you and others think about this novel.

    Liked by 1 person

    April 23, 2015
  6. One of the reasons I loved this book was all the mean-spirited humor. I didn’t expect it when I picked it up, but I highlighted so many funny bits while reading.

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    April 23, 2015
  7. Great book. Hope you’ll enjoy it! I also loved the TV series when I was a teenager, and rewatched it years afterwards. Haven’t seen the movie.. I’ve also read A Handful of Dust twice, and found it delightful.

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    April 23, 2015
  8. I’m a bit lazier than you…only working on 100 Greatest Novels, but I read Brideshead Revisted a while back on my quest and really enjoyed it. Without any spoiler, I was going to drop the big bomb that Waugh is a dude…but you already took care of that, so instead let me warn you…when I started the prologue I was pretty excited…an Army Tale. Yay! Nothing against a Bronte love stories, Carson McCullers existential journey (Carson McCullers is NOT a dude btw), or Kafka whatever you’d call Kafka tale, but a good old fashioned testosterone laden Army Tale was going to be a welcome change, but just as he fooled me with his name, Waugh fooled me with the prologue. NOT an Army Tale, but very good nonetheless.

    Liked by 1 person

    April 23, 2015
  9. It’s sort of comforting to know that even Evelyn Waugh hated his own work. I might give it a try sometime.

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    April 23, 2015
  10. I had to read this in college as an assignment, and thought the world and characters were excellent. It’s very subtle, and explores Charles, the lead character’s mind, in interesting ways. The movie, if you ever get around to watching it, is more obvious than the book, and leaves a lot of the ambiguity of the novel out. Looking forward to your review on this.

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    April 24, 2015
  11. When you listed it as one of your next 5 books to read I ordered it from the library and just finished it tonight. I was first taken in by how similar Charles and Nick (Gatby-last book I read) appeared, then by the travel discriptions, then I was bored, then I couldn’t put it down. A great read. I’ll share my favorite line when you review it.

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    April 25, 2015

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