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What’s The Most Difficult Novel You’ve Read?

What’s the most difficult novel you’ve ever read?

With that question, I don’t mean the “book you hated most.”

I think you can like a book while simultaneously believing it to be a difficult read. For example, Infinite Jest was overwhelmingly difficult, but I thought it was worth the read.

However, as difficult as Infinite Jest was to read, I would say The Sound and the Fury is the most difficult novel I’ve read to date. And, coincidentally, I hated it.

I just wasn’t a fan of Faulkner on this one. In fact, The Sound and the Fury is currently ranked 74th out of the 76 novels I’ve read from the Time list so far. I tried. Lord help me, I tried.

So what’s the most difficult novel you’ve read? And, better yet, were you able to finish reading it?

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112 Comments Post a comment
  1. uju #

    Dan Brown’s Inferno. Very laborious I tell you.

    Liked by 2 people

    January 19, 2015
    • I forgot about that book, because it too was for me, a really bad book.

      Like

      January 19, 2015
    • Was it difficult because it was poorly written? I’ve never read Dan Brown but that’s what I’ve always heard about him.

      Liked by 1 person

      January 19, 2015
      • uju #

        @Robert, it was just plain boring. Lazy plot. too many unnecessary details. Everything about that book screamed throw-me-away!

        Like

        January 20, 2015
    • I read the first chapter, then threw it across the room because it was bad, bad, really bad.

      Like

      January 20, 2015
      • uju #

        lmao!!! I hear it’s a somewhat good if you can get around to finishing it though. But there’s something about a difficult read with too much boring details that make giving up a better option 😀

        Like

        January 20, 2015
        • Elmore Leonard rule was to leave the parts readers would skip parts out of his books.

          Like

          January 20, 2015
          • uju #

            Someone should tell that to Dan Brown and George R.R Martins

            Like

            January 20, 2015
          • In Dan Brown’s case, there wouldn’t be anything left.

            Like

            January 20, 2015
  2. The most difficult classic book for me was The Grapes of Wrath. It felt like it was never going to end.
    Recently I read Signature of All Things and it was a real struggle to get to the end. I finished it finally only because I could not have an unfinished book.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
    • I quite liked Signature but I can see why it would be difficult to finish

      Like

      January 19, 2015
  3. Crime and Punishment.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  4. A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, was the best ever read!

    Like

    January 19, 2015
    • I imagine it was because the book was full of maths, right?

      Liked by 1 person

      January 19, 2015
      • At the time, was focused on learning Algebra. Stephen takes you off to another mind dimension. One very, very deep read. Love him too!

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        January 19, 2015
  5. but, tuff

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  6. After only getting 70 pages into it the first time, I went back to “Infinite Jest” last year after reading your posts. I loved the book and sometimes think about re-reading it. It is difficult, but rewarding.

    My other vote is for the only Faulkner I’ve read: “As I Lay Dying.” Had I not read it in college with knowledgable guidance, I’m sure I would have been lost.

    And as I type, I can hear my unread copy of “Ulysses” laughing at me.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  7. I’m not sure about my answer to this question, as there have been many books I’ve tussled with.

    Most notably Anna Karenina which gripped me at first. Then totally lost me, and I felt as though I were being dragged along with that icy train until the ending. It was tough to grasp the social norms of the day, the bounds restricting frank speech, and the names of characters. I’ve been told if I find a better translation, that I may enjoy it more. I remain unconvinced.

    Another book I really struggled with was The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt. This one was an enjoyable struggle though and I thoroughly enjoyed the book. The richness of the detail and the fragility of the characters made it hard to keep up, or rather, remain in one place for quite so long. Sometimes the struggle is truly worth it though, and that is definitely the case with this one.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
    • I completely get what you mean about The Goldfinch. It started off great and it just tapered off. It seemed like it would never end. The good thing was it was very well written.

      Like

      January 19, 2015
  8. My one is fairly recent actually. It was “An Untamed State” by Roxane Gay. Very good read but emotionally painful.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  9. I had to do an entire year studying Faulkner, so his books became easier to read. I would have to say, for me, either James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist (ugh…) or Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (because even the English isn’t in English lol)

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
    • Out of curiosity, or ignorance, what coursewere you in where you had to study only Faulkner?

      Like

      January 19, 2015
      • It was actually my junior year of high school AP English class

        Like

        January 19, 2015
      • We each had to pick an author to do a deep dive, course-long analysis

        Like

        January 19, 2015
  10. Dr. Zhivago! I tried reading it for a book report when I was 13, but I had to give up and watch the movie. I’ve always wanted to go back and try to read it again. Maybe someday. I really liked it though, I just wasn’t old enough to handle it.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  11. sally1137 #

    Foucault’s Pendulum by Umberto Eco. I have a pretty good vocabulary but found myself reaching for the dictionary every couple of pages. It was an excellent book; the ending was a huge epiphany. I closed the book and thought, “wow!”

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  12. Going to pipe in with the obvious vote for Joyce’s Ulysses. I can see that its excellent and sometimes you can find yourself engrossed but yet it remains unfinished!

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
    • It’s a tough one. But Finnegans Wake probably makes it look like a kids book.

      Like

      January 19, 2015
  13. Pole Panda #

    Don’t hate me. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy. The first part was ok, but halfway through the second, I continued to fall asleep every 2 pages… (you know, the passage where they ride through the wilderness… and ride… and ride… and someone says something… and then they ride on…)

    Liked the film, though.

    Oh, and sally1137 I never managed to finish the Pendulum (tried to read the Italian original, but although it should’ve been easier than the translation, I gave up after a couple of pages)…

    Liked by 2 people

    January 19, 2015
  14. I am trying to get through Infinite Jest right now, so I would say that has been the most difficult so far. I have never read The Sound and The Fury. Hopefully I will finish Infinite Jest this year at some point. Haha

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  15. The most difficult ones have also been the ones that have given me the greatest joy over the years; most worth re-reading. Ulysses, War and Peace, The Golden Bowl, The Unnameable — these come to mind. All but one of these I read first under the brilliant guidance of Jim Frakes in the English Department at Lehigh 40 years ago.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  16. Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice”. Had to read it for English Literature. I was 16 and more into horror. I also found it was written in a style where I instantly forgot what I had read.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
    • akoehler04 #

      Me too! I’ve tried to read Pride and Prejudice multiple times because I’ve heard great things about it, but I get bored so quickly. I find myself re-reading pages over and over, and it gets so tedious.

      Like

      January 20, 2015
  17. Ulysses. And no, I haven’t finished it.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  18. In high school I had a lot of trouble with George Eliot’s Middlemarch…I wonder if it would be any different if I picked it up today.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  19. I equally found The Sound and the Fury really hard to read, and I disliked it. Then, I was forced to write a thesis paper about it. Not fun. But, once I researched it and read more about it, I really appreciated Faulkner’s style. Not that I would ever read it again…

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  20. Alison's Wonderland Recipes #

    The Picture of Dorian Gray. Though this may be due to the fact that I’ve never been a big Oscar Wilde fan.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  21. I thought I’d just commented, but it may be the link was lost. So if you read this twice: sorry! I read Faulkner’s “As I lay dying” as this was obligatory lit for the teacher training course. Sorry fans of Faulkner: won’t ever try anything by him again.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  22. Without a doubt Crime and Punishment. Had to read it in college and then write 20 page paper on it. Year later … I’m glad I read it.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
    • Yes. Crime and Punishment, definitely. And Anna Karenina. But I’m glad I read these, too.

      Like

      March 25, 2015
  23. Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow. Ugh!

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  24. Jetagain #

    “The Sound and the Fury” was the most difficult book I ever finished–I had to because I was the one who recommended it for my classics book club. It was totally worth soldiering through and got easier after part one. The writing was brilliant. Two “elephants in the room” for me are “Moby Dick” which I started but didn’t finish and “Ulysses” which is too daunting.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  25. Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past. So far have completed Swann’s Way and Within a Budding Grove. Volume 2 (The Guermante Way and Cities of the Plain); and Volume 3 (The Captive, The Fugitive, The Regained) still await me. Been putting off Proust for years but finally decided to tackle because he’s considered, by some, to be the greatest of all time. And to think, all because of a little Madeleine dunked in a cup of tea.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  26. The Idiot by Dostoyevsky. I was fine with Crime and Punishment but this one completely defeated me.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  27. J.E. Fountain #

    Easily….Ulysses. (and I hated it) I agree the Sound and the Fury is difficult, but I didn’t hate it. I’m currently reading another Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom!…also pretty difficult. I’ll also mention A Clockwork Orange…very difficult due to the argot spoken by the character.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  28. Seconding Proust here 🙂 It took me years to read Swann’s Way and at the end, I felt pretty meh about it. I definitely didn’t hate it, but I probably won’t finish the rest, either.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  29. aeolianlyre #

    The most difficult book I read is The Sound and the Fury. The second most difficult and which I couldn’t finish is War and Peace due to its length and numerous characters.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  30. Finnegans Wake. I get into it a bit, and it spits me out.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  31. I loved The Sound and The Fury! It was one of my favorite reads in high school.
    I really struggled with Catch-22. I love the way that Heller writes but I could not get into it. I felt like I was just waiting for the plot to happen.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  32. Probably either Les Miserables (which I loved, but which was like trudging through treacle at times) or Jude the Obscure (which I hated with a passion). And I’m *still* only a couple of chapters into Anna Karenina.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  33. Shreya #

    I tried reading it two times because the person who recommended it to me wanted a serious discussion on it but couldn’t get to the end. Talking about Ayn Rand’s ‘The Fountainhead’.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  34. I guess mine would be more of a series if that counts. The Dark Tower series from Stephen King was almost impossible to get through. Each book was like night and day, plus time travel and alternate histories and what have you. Also, I’d say Infinite Jest fron David Foster Wallace was tough too

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  35. A Confederacy of Dunces – it was the first book I ever truly wanted to end.

    Liked by 2 people

    January 19, 2015
  36. Tolstoy’s War and Peace. I’m still working on it.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  37. Lord of the Flies – gah. First time I read it I hated it (and didn’t get why it was awesome at all). A year later I realised how brilliant and insightful it really was and so I was pumped for a reread…but even the reread sucked. I’m glad I read it, but I did not enjoy reading it. :/

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  38. Crime and Punishment: difficult, enjoyable, worth it.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  39. I’d have to say Sense and Sensibility is probably most difficult novel I ever read, both because the sentences were so long and involved and because I was just so bored by it. I didn’t even read the whole first chapter.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  40. Absolutely loved The Sound and the Fury, but had a hell of a time with As I lay dying by Faulkner, took me forever to read it and it’s pretty short, and also with Mrs. Dalloway by V. Woolf. I think it was the stream of consciousness technique in both books. At least with Mrs. Dalloway I ended up enjoying the story. Oooh, and I’ve got Ulysses coming up soon. Not an easy read, I gather.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
    • J.E. Fountain #

      I wouldn’t have comprehended half of Ulysses without chapter by chapter commentary.

      Liked by 1 person

      January 19, 2015
  41. Jocelyn Green #

    “Fifty Shades of Grey” by E.L. James was the most difficult book I’ve read. It was so boring, repetitive, and plotless I needed to force myself to read it. I felt disgust at the subject and the misogyny. So why did I bother? A current sex scandal re a celebrity caused me to want to understand what bdsm was about.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  42. On the Road by Jack Kerouac. It’s like a thousand thoughts twisted into a web and trying to figure out what it all means. Worth the read but difficult to finish.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  43. Interesting post. I’m not familiar with some of the books mentioned like the Sound and the Fury and the Infinite Jest. Fifty Shades of Grey was really hard work and I kept expecting something worthwhile at the end to justify all my effort which never came. The only book I have never finished despite two or three attempts is catch 22. Just couldn’t get the hang of it at all! Must give it one more try though!

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  44. Dickens little dorrit definitely

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  45. The Time Traveler’s Wife. I think I quit the book at the point in which he went back in time to see himself and it looked like some hanky panky between his former and current self was about to ensue. I just stopped at that point.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  46. Ruth Fox #

    To the lighthouse by Virginia Woolf, Sons and Lovers by DH Lawrence and Great Expectations by Dickens – I had to read them for degree/GCSE courses. I had to read pages out loud to stop my mind wandering sometimes! But I was glad I had persevered with all three. It’s interesting to see how much books being easy to read seems to be mostly a matter of taste.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  47. suddenlysonder #

    For me it was Orwell’s 1984. Not because it was too long, but because it required so much focus and sometimes it was tiring. Even though it was quite challenging, I managed to finish it and can say that I liked it a lot.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  48. PublicEnemyNo.3788 #

    To the Lighthouse-Virginia Woolf

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  49. For the life of my I just couldn’t get into the Game of Thrones Books. I always prefer books to movies/TV Series and because everyone had been raving about it I picked up the first book and laboured through the first 100 pages. It was very scattered and had too many characters that in the end I just didn’t had the patience.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 19, 2015
  50. Mine would have to be The Unbearable Lightness of Being. The English translation were unnecessarily long.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  51. Honestly, Probably Sound and Fury. I find a lot of 20th century lit difficult, because the Modernist/early post-modernist coloring is hard for me to understand from the beginning. Once I get through to the human parts I can identify with, I’m fine…but Sound and Fury annoyed the snot out of me.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  52. Dispite the fact that I loved A TALE OF LOVE AND DARKNESS by Amos Oz I found it difficult .

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  53. My most difficult book was The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. It won the Man Booker Prize for 2013. I was interested in it as it depicted mid 1800’s Hokitika, New Zealand. She wrote in the style that was popular for that time. Technically it was good I suppose. I just had no sympathy for the main characters and it was very hard to follow the plot. I stuck with it and it was such a relief to finish it. I have never really struggled with reading any book as I was brought up on the early classics. This was really hard.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  54. I didn’t find The Sound and The Fury difficult. However, Anna Karenina was a bear.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  55. Difficulty’s hard to pin down, but The Brothers Karamazov, by Dostoevsky came to mind first. It’s got quite an ensemble cast, and supposedly it’s only one third of a projected trilogy. Maybe I’ve learned something since then, because Crime and Punishment and The Idiot didn’t seem so hard. Eco is an obvious contender, and while Foucault’s Pendulum might be tough, I think there’s a reason you don’t hear much about Baudolino or The Island of the Day Before. They seem to fall more on the just plain bad side of difficult, though.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  56. Senior year of high-school AP English, we read Homer’s Odyssey and the Iliad. But what I remember most is doing an oral book report on Beowulf, though I couldn’t get through it and never read it. Yet, somehow I got an A anyway.

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  57. Yas #

    The most difficult book I’ve read is the one I’m currently reading – Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges. As absorbing and compelling the story is, as someone who did not study Mathematics past my ‘A’ Levels, it is very difficult to understand the mathematical concepts peppered throughout the narrative. It’s been a long ride, but I’m (finally!) almost finished with it. Well worth the effort though. 🙂

    Like

    January 19, 2015
  58. I recently read thirty pages of “The Martian”. I kept turning the pages, begging the author to get on with the story. It got so bogged down with the scientific minutiae that I just gave up. And it started so well.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  59. Anh #

    Norwegian Wood. I couldn’t bring myself to finish the book the first time. I know many people think it’s a great one but I just don’t feel comfortable reading it.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  60. Snap – I found The Sound and the Fury absolutely torturous and…I HATED it! I also found We Need to Talk About Kevin fairly difficult to read, but at the same time quite brilliant.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  61. Oh dear. The Sound and the Fury is on my reading list for later in the year. I just finished 100 Years of Solitude. It was the most difficult book I’ve tackled to date. I struggled through the first 200 pages or so. I found the ending tied it all together: the style it was written in and the generational approach. I finished it a couple of days ago and I’m still not sure how I feel about the book. Would I struggle through it again? Would I recommend it? I will have to sit on that for a while.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  62. I want to say The Hobbit because I found it very boring and it would always put me to sleep. Unfortunately, I have a feeling that if I re-read it I might really enjoy it.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  63. Reblogged this on Dentro il cerchio.

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    January 20, 2015
  64. I believe students shouldn’t be assigned Faulkner until at least upper level college courses. Because to fully understand some of his greatest work you have to obey Faulkner’s own scolding of his wife after she complained about having trouble with The Sound and the Fury…”Read it again.”

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  65. The Sound and the Fury is such a difficult book, but I love it. The most difficult book I’ve read would probably have to be A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce. It just felt so needlessly heady and complicated, and I couldn’t get into it.

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    January 20, 2015
  66. It’s funny, I think it changes with time and age. Up until this past year I would’ve answered The Two Towers from The Lord of the Rings when I read it in High School. It took me weeks to get through it, but recently I re-read it and was impressed with it.

    Other than that I’ve always struggled with anyone who pontificates too much (think most of the Russian Classics) because they often delve into very time specific details that are completely lost on me.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  67. A very short history of nearly everything by Bill Bryson- too many things encountered for the first time and struggled to comprehend so much of it! but it was worth every bit of labour

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  68. emilymullaswilson #

    I feel like such a wimp for admitting this, but Portrait of a Lady. It was WAY harder for me than even the Russians, mostly because of the excessive navel gazing; there were so many long pages spent vaguely describing the characters’ ambiguous internal states. But I stuck with it (took me eight months of intermittent reading), and it got better toward the end.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  69. I’m with The Sound and the Fury critics; however, I read it forever ago in school, and wonder if I could decipher it better now. I’m currently reading The Brothers Karamazov in small chunks so that I can finish it before I die. I think it is worthy of the effort, but really the most difficult book for sentence complexity and thematic depth. Like Belinda above, I stopped reading A Hundred Years of Solitude. Hopefully I will someday be able to re-try and enjoy it as I did Love in the Time of Cholera.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  70. Probably Beowulf in high school. I did finish it per the desire to not fail English 4…but it was hard to get through and I hated it. Then in college I had to read it again, got through, and loved it! I guess a year really can make a difference.

    Like

    January 20, 2015
  71. For me the most difficult book that I read is Les Miserables, because of it’s length. But I finished it and it was definitely worth it. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    January 20, 2015
  72. It’s a tie between Divine Comedy and Absalom, Absalom!. I think they were straightforward, but to a fault. Maybe following stream-of-consciousness, or having difficulty in doing so, is my own fault. I read both twice and fairly recently, and I just remember thinking, while reading both stories, ‘did I miss something?’. I have an easier time with Derrida than I did with those two!

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    January 21, 2015
  73. Difficult book? Roger Penrose ‘The Emperor’s New Mind’ — and I too like science!

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    January 21, 2015
  74. PS Not a novel of course though it sounds like one.

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    January 21, 2015
  75. Under the Volcano — and not just because of the writing style but also because of how relentlessly sad it was, as you pointed out in your entry on it.

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    January 21, 2015
  76. Johnathan Strange and Mr. Norell. I tried finishing it three times, and was not able to.

    Like

    January 22, 2015
  77. Jeannee Waseck #

    Loving Frank

    Like

    January 22, 2015
  78. Rosemary Zimmermann #

    Throwing another stone on the “Ulysses” pile. DEAR GOD JOYCE WHAT WERE YOU SMOKING.

    Like

    January 22, 2015
  79. Liz #

    In the difficult but worth it category, I’d definitely pick Sound and the Fury. Read it three times. As for hard slogs that I finished only through spite, that’d be the one you’re reading now, House for Mr. Biswas.

    Like

    January 22, 2015
  80. Anna Karenina–the names killed me! When I got to the part where a young woman who had introduced her fiancé to her family a few chapters before showed up and seemed to be engaged to someone else–and her father was just as pleased as he had the first time–I gave up. Hope this isn’t a spoiler, but it was n’t a different guy, just the Russian habit of everyone having 3-4 different names/nicknames, many of which don’t look any thing like each other, and all of which look to us English speakers like girls’ names. Sheesh.

    Like

    January 23, 2015
  81. Two come to mind. The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table, and One Hundred Years of Solitude. I finished the first, not the second.

    Like

    January 23, 2015
  82. For me, the most difficult novel I have “tried” to read is Moby Dick. I found a readalong a couple of years ago, but I could never keep up because I just couldn’t get with the writing and I wasn’t even sure what I was reading. It started to mess with my reading confidence (it was 5 years ago when I was trying to get into classics) and I just put it down. Maybe one day I will pick it back up and try again, but I highly doubt it since I know what happens in the book.

    Liked by 1 person

    January 24, 2015
  83. Elaine Sargent #

    One Hundred Years of Solitude. A book that quote “everyone should read” I say no one should torture themselves. I got halfway through it. Nothing was happening and seriously like five characters had the SAME name wtf!!

    Like

    January 24, 2015
  84. Not to be too picky but…The question is “what’s the most difficult novel you’ve read?” and some of the books mentioned in responses are not novels i.e. they are not fictional.

    My choice, based on books I can actually remember reading, is “War and Peace” by Tolstoy, just due to its length and inclusion of long descriptions of actual historical events and people interspersed with the fictional. It was worth reading, though, and having maps and character listings in some of the editions was a big help. As a matter of fact, I think having this data easily accessible would make many books more enjoyable for most readers.

    Interestingly, novels that I can recall that I hated reading, were “Anna Karenina” also by Tolstoy, and “The Secret History” by Donna Tartt. I didn’t like these because I didn’t like the characters. I’ve been amused to see the latter on bookstore shelves recently, mainly due to the more currently popularity of “The Goldfinch” by the same author. I’m looking forward to reading the latter with one of my book clubs, just to see if I like its characters any better than those who were the protagonists of “The Secret History.”

    Like

    January 27, 2015
  85. The MOST difficult? Assuming you mean starting at page one, to my mind there is no contest whatsoever. FINNEGAN’S WAKE. My god, that first page! “Portrait” by comparison is light reading and “Ulysses” is clear water sailing.

    Like

    January 29, 2015
  86. I would agree with Infinite Jest. Quite a slog

    Like

    February 10, 2015
  87. Hmmm I’ve come across many novels that I’ve really wanted to end. Some of them, for instance James Herbert’s Once was just a drag with too much repetitive description and story points. Others have been masterpieces in many ways but there have been parts of them that have been a nightmare to get through. One such novel was George Orwell’s 1984. The novel is wonderful and I really found myself on the side of the protagonist however the middle section where the book is being described is painfully slow and tedious.

    Then you have the likes of Stephen King’s Misery. The book was one of the most miserable pieces of work I have read and although I can appreciate the level of writing involved I nearly gave up.

    My blog has many reviews, author biographies and general opinion pieces based on reading, writing and literature in general.

    Like

    February 15, 2015

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