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Do You Care If A Book Is Self Published?

That’s my question for you today.

As I’m patiently waiting to hear from a publisher about my book idea, I’ve also considered self-publishing as a fallback. But is it really a “fallback?”

A few years ago, that was my impression. And let’s be honest, books like this one don’t help that perception.

But then I got to thinking. Truth is, if you’re a blogger, you self publish. Anyone can write a blog, just like anyone can self publish a book. There’s a wide variety of quality and depth throughout both. A blog, like a self-published book, is what you make of it. 

And on the practical side of things, you have the potential to make more money by self-publishing. Sure, you might not get a small advance or a (probably minimal) marketing push from a publisher. You’ll have to market the book and hire an editor and designer on your own. You won’t make it into Barnes & Noble.

But you’ll also keep most of the profits. If your book does moderately successful on Amazon, you could make a nice paycheck. If you’re a first-time author, you’ll have the chance to build your brand and expand your audience—which sets you up to possibly go the traditional publishing route the next time around, if that interests you.

These are some of the pros and cons of self-publishing I’ve been thinking about lately. If it doesn’t work with a traditional publisher, then I’ll likely go that route.

And you can be certain that I’ll hire a professional editor and designer to help with the book. I have no desire to make this list of terrible book covers.

But I want to hear your thoughts.

Do you view self-published books differently than traditionally published books? Do you care either way?

(Image: Getty)

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80 Comments Post a comment
  1. Why?

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  2. you are art

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  3. It depends. I’ve read books that are self-published and stellar. I’ve also read self-published books the way a slush pile reader does – one or two chapters and delete from my Kindle. Sadly, some books don’t even make my Kindle – when the blurb is terribly written.

    I’m assuming you will write a book that is well edited and carefully constructed. But there are other areas of challenges for self-publishing. Copy editing, if you use Kindle getting the book into Kindle format (hopefully with page numbers). From what I’ve heard Kindle keeps a huge chunk of profits.

    Then there is the book marketing. You can have the best book out there but, if you don’t have a marketing audience people won’t know it’s there. And you can do too much self-promoting on blogs and comments to other blogs and that can turn people off. Do you have a speaking platform? My pastor self-publishes, but he speaks at various churches where he can sell his books. He recently put an expensive ad in a Christian magazine, but the phones are not ringing off the hook. Name recognition matters.

    I’m assuming you’ve researched this. If you’d like, when I get blog posts in my mailbox that deal with the challenges of self-publishing, I can forward you the link. All my above comments are things I’ve learned from researching myself. I haven’t self-published.

    Hope what I’ve said is helpful

    Liked by 7 people

    October 10, 2014
    • Very much helpful. Thanks.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
    • Couldn’t have said it better than Heather! I don’t mind self-published books; I mind when I can tell they are self-published because no one bothered to have them properly edited. I am trying to go the traditional publishing route, but I will consider self-publishing if that doesn’t work out. Marketing is, I would think, the biggest challenge. But I really enjoy the marketing aspect, so I’m actually looking forward to that part–even if I do end up with a traditional publisher.

      Like

      October 15, 2014
  4. Either way doesn’t matter to me. I’ve read several self-published books I’ve enjoyed.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  5. Honestly, my reading a self-published book will depend on a few things:
    -the book cover
    -the relevancy of the subject material
    -the first page

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  6. whereare #

    From my experience it is a fallback. I listened to NYT best selling author Aliya S. King
    recently. She shared that in the industry that self-published books are looked down upon.
    They feel most are unpolished. I believe them she called them street lit. This may be true,
    but a self-published book and author has ideas and insights like anyone else. Unfortunately,
    the book publishing is segmented like everything else is in America.

    Hopefully, technology can help to change this, but don’t ask me how. Until then self-published
    works are just as good as anybody else’s work.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  7. The problem I have with some self published books is that they haven’t been edited or proofread properly. But if the book has been edited and proofread like a professionally published book it doesn’t matter who published it.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  8. I am open to self-published books but what I find is there is usually a quality difference. Traditional publishing undergoes a rigorous polishing processes that allows for a higher quality book (most of the time). While I do believe self-publishing can produce quality books, I don’t take a lot of chances buying them. Usually I can tell from the description of the novel and the first page if it is worth buying — but not always.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
    • Honestly, if it’s done poorly, all you have to do is look at the cover. Don’t even need to read the description. I feel like over the last few years, though, more people are “getting it” when it comes to self publishing their own books.

      Liked by 1 person

      October 10, 2014
      • Robert, you may be correct, but consider what a publishing house can offer you that a huge corporation like Amazon cannot. Amazon has no problem putting small bookstores and the like out of business because Bezos says “that’s progress.” They also offer you very little outside of the means to publish. A publishing house, however, can help you with marketing and such because your success directly affects them. Also, you are putting more books in stores — which is important.

        Also, the norm is to be rejected (especially if you are a first time author). Consider Stephen King. He had written five novels before FINALLY getting picked up. (It’s not the case for all authors.) This is a normal process of the business and it makes you a better writer for it. Consider what he’s like now. Instant book deals, movie deals, and other great things. But he didn’t take shortcuts. He worked hard.

        Also, consider small presses too. Not all small presses require a literary agent. Some of the more prestigious ones may even have marketing budgets. Research and persistence helps.

        Like

        October 10, 2014
        • Good thoughts. Like I said, traditional is my first option. A lot has changed, though. Publishers will spent a minimal amount marketing a first-time author, unless you have a HUGE platform. I might be able to do a better job on my own. We’ll see how it plays out.

          Liked by 2 people

          October 10, 2014
    • Your right when it comes to the “polishing” of a book. You can tell.

      Liked by 1 person

      October 10, 2014
  9. Great topic. If it’s a good read, it’s a good read. The publishing industry naturally looks down on self-publishers. But they don’t provide much marketing help unless you’re in the Stephen King class; nor will they arrange or pay for your book tour. Think one must evaluate what benefits a traditional publisher will offer, vs your efforts as a self-publisher, if accepted. And consider any networking and connections offered, too.

    Kiss of death for me on a self-published novel: Crap cover and interior design coupled with a cheap price. Those factors say “unprofessional.” Aim for a cover design that looks like any respected literary fiction novel and you’ll attract my attention, no matter who is the publisher.

    Looking forward to seeing how this works out for you and best of luck.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
    • Great thoughts. Yes, the cover is unbelievably important. I’ll be more than willing to spend some money for a really good designer to come up with something.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
      • Suggestion, if I may: Explore book covers that jump off the shelves at you AND are in your genre or what you’d consider competition. Investigate the portfolios and book marketing chops of those designers. Good designers will be good at marketing too, and should bring more than just a pretty cover to your book project.

        Liked by 1 person

        October 10, 2014
  10. I highly recommend self publishing. I’ve recently done it myself. Sure, it puts a lot of work on yourself but I believe the outcome has been worth it. For me, I didn’t want to give away the rights to my own stories or have them edited in a way I wasn’t happy with. I also wanted to have control over the design. I hired an editor and copyeditor and cover designer while I focused on writing and illustrations. I’m very very happy with the finished product!! And it’s selling and getting great reviews. So exciting!

    You can check out my book on Amazon in paperback. It’s also available from Kindle (which was produced in HTML) and on iBook which is another format. I used Scrivener to write and format my book and getting book compiled in various formats. I highly recommend that tool! Feel free to email me with any questions about the process.

    Here’s my book if you want to look inside, or buy a copy. 🙂

    “Confessions of a Rambunctious Kid: A Quest for Self-Discovery and the Meaning of Life” by Jennifer Leigh Allison

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0990771202/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_Ag-nub05N66KY

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  11. How a book was puplished has never been a factor in choosing a book to read.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  12. A good book is a good book no matter what its provenance.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  13. jamieaaron03 #

    I’m working on a book now that will be self published. I just want to do things my way, and I don’t want to bother with corporate America anyways. Don’t let any of that stuff get in your way:)

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  14. I look at self pu’d books from 2 points of view: as a reader, and as a librarian.

    As a reader, I’m open to them but wary. I’ll typically only try a self-pub’d book if (a) I’m already familiar with the author or I’ve heard good things, (b) it is easy to obtain and not too expensive, and (c) the cover and blurb or preview pages spark my interest. But I only read maybe 2 self pub’d books a year, and other than a few comics I’ve not been impressed. There are definitely worse traditionally pub’d books out there, though — sometimes “marketability” seems more important to publishers than actual quality, which is why I try to keep an open mind.

    As a librarian, though, I have to pass over the vast majority of self pub’d books that come my way. There are several reasons for this: (a) a big part of our selection process depends on professional/trade reviews, which mostly pass over self pub’s, (b) we have a limited budget to play with and the vast majority of it goes to best sellers, replacements, and patron requests, (c) most of our cataloging/processing is outsourced because we don’t have the staff to give each individual book that kind of attention, and (d) — this is a big thing — many, many self pub’d authors, in my experience, are actually a pain to work with. I know that sounds harsh, but it seems like many authors have the attitude that the library *owes* them not only money and a space on the shelf, but a big customized display and a signing event and other promotional stuff. If you’re a self pub’d author, here’s a tip: the library wants to do what is the best interest of their patrons/community, *not* what is in the best interest of individual authors.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  15. Out of five self-published books that I read (giveaways), four were a complete let-down. Amateurish formating, no proofreading at all, weak plot, and so faulty English that even I as a non-native speaker living in a non-English-speaking country found lots of them.

    Despite all, I believe that self-publishing is a great opportunity for new writers without contacts in the literary world. But of course, it requires thorough preparation.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  16. 1banjo #

    Here is the Publishers Weekly review of my self-published book The Great Liars:

    “This meticulously constructed thriller from Carroll delivers healthy doses of political conspiracy, paranoia, and pulse-pounding suspense. Oral historian Harriet Gallatin gets more than she bargained for when she begins recording the recollections of former Navy Lt. Lowell Brady, who now resides in an old-age home, but who, during WWII, uncovered a terrible secret about Pearl Harbor. And when Gallatin is ordered to report what Brady shares, what began as a routine assignment becomes a race against time and a battle for survival. Military absurdity and governmental betrayal are depicted with wit and humor in this provocative portrait of outsiders whose honor transforms them from respectable citizens to demonized agitators. Cantankerous, lewd, vulgar, and skillfully rendered by the author, Brady is as warm as he is infuriating. Carroll has crafted a crowd-pleasing page-turner, replete with cultural criticism and refreshing honesty.”

    Reviewed on: 08/25/2014

    Now go here to see the cover, chosen on-line and downloaded from the Library of Congress.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/20899922-the-great-liars?ac=1

    As soon as I saw the image, taken in 1942 by a protégé of Dorothea Lange, I knew it was perfect. But it took looking through hundreds of photographs, many of which, like the one I chose, are in the public domain and free. After my wife, an award-winning poet, and I made many passes through the manuscript hunting down typos and other barbarisms (a few slipped by, alas), I found and hired a meticulous book designer in Nova Scotia (Dog-ear Book Design) to put the cover together and do the formatting for Create/Space. The result was handsome and professional looking, better than the job done on my Top Dog, a NYT best-seller published by the Ace imprint of Penguin. As others have noted, attention to detail is all important. A cheap-looking book studded with spelling, grammatical and other mistakes quickly turns off readers and damages your prospects down the road, as does a nothing-burger cover. These are usually given away for free, further confirming the adage that you get what you pay for. If you have spent years researching and writing a book, as I did with The Great Liars, you want to send it out looking good, otherwise you might as well have spent your time on worthy hobbies like growing orchids or building ships in a bottle. Promotion is a drag without a publishing house behind you. It is pretty much a full-time job, which means — guess what? — you are not writing the next book.

    Liked by 3 people

    October 10, 2014
  17. I love reading self-published books; a lot of them are brilliantly original. I second your assertion that high production values make the difference: good editing, proofreading, and cover are essential. The promo is definitely hard work, but you can do it how you want to, and there’s a huge community of readers who love indie.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  18. I tend to steer away from self-published books unless I know the author. I have read some but they are mostly instructional. I hate to admit it but yes, if I see a self-published book I’m skeptical and assume it’s most likely not a very great book. That being said, I totally get it if an author who is already established gets tired of the crap and strikes out on his own. That makes sense to me and I support that. Which is totally backwards I know– but it kind of makes sense too right?

    Usually most people work for companies before striking out on their own. And you’d feel comfortable using that person’s services; probably moreso than someone who is just starting and is doing so on their own. You admire them but yeah I don’t think you’d trust them to do as good work as the other person would you?

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
    • I agree with you there. But at the same time I feel like we don’t know anything. What’s right, whats wrong? At least I don’t. But we have….Aaaa fuck, what am I talking about; this is too complex.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
      • I know what you mean. It’s relatively new. More power to the little guy trying to strike out on their own but I’m old school and risk-adverse LOL

        Liked by 1 person

        October 10, 2014
    • Good points. I think if a person is established as a writer and doesn’t just come out of nowhere, then the expectation for their book (and hopefully the result) will be much higher quality. It goes back to a post I made recently–no, everyone is not a writer.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
  19. I go with self publishing, and publishing it as an eBook, not hard copy. More and more readers are coming to that conclusion. As we all know, just because a book is published by a publisher does not necessarily mean it is quality. We’ve all read professionally published books that were total crap. These days, self publishing does not have the taint it used to. A number of self-published writers have gone on to sell thousands of copies. When i am going to check out an eBook that has been recommended to me, I usually read the sample. if I like it, then I buy it.

    For a first book, it makes a lot of sense. And more and more writers, even the famous ones, are doing their own publishing. They see that getting a publisher to put out their book is really no guarantee for success. You can end up sending a book out for years and waiting months on end, then continuing to receive rejections. Once it is published, the writer reaps only a small percentage of the financial rewards. There is also the fact that you may very well not like the cover. Once the physical book is put on the shelves, it more than likely will not get a choice spot. Then there is the issue of marketing. The writer does most of that. If our self-published eBook sells a lot of copies, then the publishers will take notice.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  20. Reblogged this on nought2awesome and commented:
    Yeah ….do YOU care….let me know…..

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  21. They say that traditional publishing is much like a lottery. They also say self-publishing is also like a lottery, but a different one. It’s nice to see that a few here have mentioned that a good read is a good read, and that being true, it largely comes down to marketing.

    In my experience, the writing is the much easier part of the publishing endeavor, compared to the marketing . . . the latter takes a lot more time and effort, unless you happen to win the lottery. I’m self-published. By the way, so was Mark Twain and several others at one time, but I’m sure you know that. That bunch didn’t need to worry about covers.

    Now I’m curious about those who put so much emphasis on the cover for self-published books – do you do the same when browsing in book stores? Prejudice is funny, yes and no? Finally, it would have been nice to see an example of an outstanding book cover from an indie author. I know of several examples, and they’re not so hard to find.

    Liked by 2 people

    October 10, 2014
    • I would say that, across the board, traditional published books have much better covers. Yes, some suck. But there’s not near as much disparity when you’re browsing in the store. With self published, if you hire a pro designer, then there shouldn’t be a noticeable difference on the design itself (maybe on the quality of the paper and that kind of thing). I think the worst books are the self published ones when the author tries to do it all on their own. Unless you have a design background and can pull it off, hire someone. Otherwise, your book just looks amateurish.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
      • I agree, though with online presentation the paper stock isn’t the issue. I saw a blog post awhile ago where an executive from a major publisher mentioned a figure of $6,000 for cover design. With that kind of budget, it better be good.

        Perhaps the smartest thing indies could so as a group is make all the covers wine red, with a readable title and author name. Maybe then people will focus more on the content?

        I’ve never bought a book based on the cover design.

        Liked by 1 person

        October 10, 2014
        • Yeah, I’ve never bought a book based on cover design, but I’ll tell you I have avoided buying many a book BECAUSE OF cover design.

          Like

          October 13, 2014
  22. All I know is that the self-published books I’ve read really, really, needed a good editor. In the Vampire 2000 series, there were chapters that repeated actions that had taken place moments before. I had agreed to review this book of a PR firm but called them back and stated there was no way I could give the book a positive review. I ended up running a canned interview.

    What bothered me the most about this book was it had an interesting and different take on the vampire story, using the African folk lore as its basis. As writers, we need to step back and let an editor do their job to make the work better. I am in a writers group to have feedback on my latest effort. I need to hear what other people think and what needs to be revised.

    At this point, I look at self-publishing as a vanity project. I have not had the opportunity to read a well-written self published book yet. But I hope to, someday.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  23. I have to ask people who are posting that self-published books are a waste of time, did you actually take the time to look on Amazon (or whatever e-book format you use) to check if a book was self-published or not? I certainly never have. If I am skimming though books for online purchase that is not even part of the criteria I use. Why would I? Will it influence whether the writing is good? Maybe. But then again, look at some of the crap that was published. I personally can’t stand the Twilight series and don’t think Suzanne Collins used any imagination whatsoever after the first Hunger Games. Nor do I really care for James Patterson, or later Stephen King. Yet obviously those names sell.

    Most writing is all about taste: what one person loves, another may hate; and vice versa. I may pitch a book to 100 publishers and those 100 people who read the first five pages of a manuscript may not like it; but is that to say it’s a bad book? No.

    At this point in the game, self pubbing is just another option – and just like regular books some will be brilliant, and some will be a pile of crap.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  24. Laura Gómez Ceballo #

    Well, the important thing is the quality of what you are reading, no matter if it’s self published or not. In my country, we have a lack of publishers, so if you can afford it, i think it is much better go for self-publishing.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
    • I think the quality is very important. But. But. Your right Laura..(but I also feel this is a big ass grey area in writing) My answer: Yesno. This is complex.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
      • Laura Gómez Ceballo #

        Yes indeed, its not an easy choice. I don’t know how it works the publishing world in US or other countries, not have much knowledge about it, but here in Dominican Republic, the publishing world is very reduced, so honestly you don’t earn much not matter if its with a publisher or self-publishing

        Liked by 1 person

        October 10, 2014
        • I’m just happy your writing Laura. Stay cool 😉

          Like

          October 10, 2014
          • Laura Gómez Ceballo #

            Thanks, you too 😀

            Like

            October 12, 2014
  25. I think you have enough of a base to self-publish as an alternative! With the people who interact with you on here and the number of visitors you’d have, I think you have a good chance of getting the word out there.

    But fingers crossed for the traditional route (it’s always nice :-D)!

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
    • Fingers crossed for you. And me. And her, her and her. And him. But not her over there in the corner. Never-mind. She can come too.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
    • Thanks Geoff. We’ll see. I hope to know from a publisher soon. I’ve only pitched to two right now. If that fails, I’ll have to decide whether to send out the proposals to more publishers or go the self-publish route.

      Like

      October 10, 2014
  26. In my opinion self publishing can be good IF you meet all of the above criteria. 🙂

    If you know about Iqbal his most famous poetry was self published. He never used a publisher and it was in times when his poetry was spoken by every child in the subcontinent. (He could have easily got a publisher then)

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  27. I think if you do self-publishing the right way with an editor and designer it could be a great way to go. I feel like some people who self-publish just want to rush and get it out there because they can, but it takes time to make a book worth reading. Paying for that editor and designer will ultimately help the book be better. Overall, I don’t see anything wrong with self-publishing.

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  28. This is a wonderful thread. I have learned quite a bit just reading the comments. I just self published my first book and now I am sitting back rethinking my cover and my marketing strategies. I feel like I put this story out into the world and it was swallowed up in a massive sea of self publishers like myself. I am shifting gears for the next one and now hope to save enough money to hire a proof-reader and a cover designer. Thank you all for the information and opinions!

    Great original question!

    Like

    October 10, 2014
    • Awesome. Glad it’s sparked discussion and thoughts. I’ve learned a lot too!

      Like

      October 10, 2014
  29. I think you should check out Nick Owchar’s analysis at Call of the Siren (http://nickowchar.com/). Food for thought. Whatever you do, hire a professional editor and graphic designer.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  30. As a reader, I don’t mind if a book is self-published or not. I choose it because of it’s description, because I think I might like it, not because of the way it was published. I’d always give self-publishers the same chance as traditionally published authors.
    I remember reading two self-published novels this year. One was an high-fantasy-steampunk mixture, the other one an urban fantasy-young adult story. The first one was written by an American author, the latter by a German author. Unfortunately, I have to admit that both were rather disappointing. But this doesn’t mean I wouldn’t buy a further self-published book.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  31. I hardly ever read books published today. If I do, it’s probably only because people whose reviews I trust recommended them to me. If a blogger whose posts I like writes a books, I definitely will go out and buy it. I like the blogger’s work so it doesn’t matter to me whether the book was published traditionally or not. Basically, if the book sounds good and I trust the recommender or I like what the author has already published (even in the blogosphere), I will get the book. Think about how many thousands and thousands of books are published via the traditional route every year. How many of them are actually read widely if at all? So, just because they are published traditionally doesn’t mean they will be good or even known. Like I said, I hardly ever read a book that is less than 50 years old. So if I do it’s because I know something about the author or I value the recommender’s opinion. Publication route is irrelevant to me.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  32. I once read that John Steinbeck kept about 120 rejection slips from one of his first books. He kept at it. So should we.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  33. If self-published authors could band together and form a collective imprint to indicate to potential readers some form of quality control, that might be the best of both world of traditional publishing and self-publishing.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  34. I honestly don’t care if a book is self-published or has gone through a publisher. I look at the quality and care that has gone into the finished product. I’ve read self-published books which were stellar and I’ve read publisher books which have been horrible.

    The main thing about self-publishing is that the author has control. The author gets final say on cover, blurb, and contents. This can be a good thing if the author holds their final product to a high standard but can backfire if the author is just looking for a fast track to being published.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  35. Val Mills #

    I don’t know where you live, but self publishing is far more acceptable here in New Zealand than it previously was. In fact, it’s quite the thing. Go for it I say. I’ve successfully self published a little local social history book and will self-publish the next one too.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  36. I enjoy several self-published authors. Hugh Howey in particular. He has a lot to say on this subject and you should check out his blog.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  37. No, I don’t care if a book is self published. I always read the first five pages of a book, whether it is self published or not, before I purchase it. You can tell a lot about the ability of the writer in those first few pages.

    Like

    October 10, 2014
  38. I honestly don’t care. I’ve read some really good self-published books!

    Liked by 1 person

    October 10, 2014
  39. The only thing that pushes me away from self publishing is I would like to have a paper print on demand set up to somehow, just so it isn’t kindle only.

    Like

    October 11, 2014
  40. I have to say, it’s all about how you present your work to me initially. Lets face it you can take in a cover and a title quicker than blurb and that can make you decide whether or not you are potentially interested in seeing more about this book.
    Next I’ll read the blurb.
    And then if I’m still unsure… I’ll look at the reviews.

    At the end of the day, the content is the same. But it’s the marketing and grabbing peoples interest enough that makes the difference. With enough work – a good cover and editing – I stress editing, because man although a good cover is an eye catcher so many self published authors skip the editing – end up with bad reviews because of it and then less sales.

    Good luck, whichever route you decide to take!

    Liked by 1 person

    October 11, 2014
  41. I’ve read self pubbed and traditionally pubbed, and produced both as well. The key is superb quality and editing. Both types can deliver that. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    October 11, 2014
  42. Nida Faridi #

    Reblogged this on Ever After and commented:
    Should I self publish my short novel or pitch it? I’m plagued with the fear of rejection.

    Like

    October 11, 2014
  43. Putri Warinagia #

    Reblogged this on Living is Loving.

    Like

    October 11, 2014
  44. The way the book was produced doesn’t really matter as it doesn’t affect the author’s work. So, as long as the quality of the content in the book is good it doesn’t really matter if it was self published.

    Like

    October 12, 2014
  45. Some self-published books are trash, but some are surprisingly good! I’m open to either format, as long as the book sounds interesting. I would say, “Go for it!”

    Like

    October 12, 2014
  46. This is a great question! I get sent a lot of self published books for my work and until recently I would have said the vast majority were awful. I think the landscape has changed though. Really good beta readers and editing and a plethora of online support for cover artwork etc can make a huge difference. And self publishing as a 99 cent ebook can lead to publishing house attention.

    Ultimately a publishing house will polish a book more. But also vet the content and author. So it makes you wonder what stories aren’t being told. And best selling authors seem to get away with anything at all, even via a publisher.

    I have no idea if that makes sense jetlag is doing strange things to my brain. Great food for thought.

    Like

    October 13, 2014
  47. Interesting topic. I am in the process of self publishing the first of two books, both light and humorous in nature. However I took a year to learn everything I could about the industry in order to give my books every chance to be successful. Solid editing, test marketing and learning to get to know my audience and most importantly advertising!

    The biggest problem I see in self publishing is authors don’t promote or know how to promote their books. twenty percent of my budget is the book itself, eighty percent will go to the promotion of the books.

    If an author is willing to make that kind of commitment, I don’t see why a publishing company would be necessary.

    Oh and it would help if the public actually likes the content. 🙂

    Like

    October 13, 2014
  48. One of the most successful books in Spain was 2012’s La Saga de Los Longevos by Eva García Saenz. She took her book to various publishers and was repeatedly rejected. After she got fed up with being rejected by publishers, she self-published an ebook and quickly rose to #1. Publishers begged her for the book and when they finally did publish it, it flew off the shelves.

    If a book is good, it will sell regardless.

    Like

    October 13, 2014
  49. erickt77 #

    Reblogged this on erickt77 and commented:
    Lectura Actual

    Like

    October 14, 2014
  50. I self-publish (fairly successfully, to be honest) so of course I’m going to say I don’t and it’s more or less true. Which is to say that I do not really care whether a book has come from some large publisher or has been put together by one guy with a word processor, but I do care that the work has been done professionally. I don’t need perfection, but if the writing is amateurish and it clearly never got proofread once (I’m not talking professionally, I mean at all) then I will reject the book. (I’m making the money now to get all my stuff professionally proofread, and I am happy to spend the money doing so. It makes me feel better about charging for books.)

    But as unklethan points out above, self-publishing is putting a lot of very worthwhile books out to be read which would never have got anywhere with a publisher. That means it’s a fairly worthwhile process looking to see what can be got from the non-traditional publishing sector.

    Usually, self-published books are also cheaper, which helps.

    Like

    October 15, 2014
  51. I’m indie published, so of course I could spout off on how I believe that a writer is a writer even if they don’t publish “traditionally”

    but I think that suffice it to say that even as an indie publisher, I have to be careful about what “indie” books I buy. I don’t love the traditional model, but I also think that it does a fair amount of weeding.

    If people don’t think self published books count, however, their current industry trends may real tick them off later.

    Like

    October 15, 2014
  52. The self-publishing game has changed. It’s no longer a “fallback”. For some authors it’s a much better place to be! I think for most readers it just comes down to quality. If you invest in editing, proofreading, etc. and have a great story to tell, they won’t care where it came from.

    Like

    October 30, 2014
  53. Reneer #

    Problem with all self-publishers is no editing. they don’t fork out the cash to properly edit books and they end up getting negative reviews for the gazillion typos and grammar problems. There’s also been a severe problem of historical or scientific references that are completely wrong.
    Readers get really distracted with writers that self-edit and at the end, take it out on the author in scathing reviews, which have the next people coming along read those reviews and making the decision to not read the book after all.
    One self-publisher I know, recently posted on social media that he was taking his family on a long vacation to a ritzy resort, but when you look at his reviews he’s only got perhaps 20 reviews here and then 7 on another book.
    This is one of the selfies that make less than $500 per year (Amazons stats show more than half of selfies fall into this category).
    The way to tell if a self-publisher has made any money is to take a peek at the reviews. If the numbers are up into the thousands on each and every book they’ve written, then they are in the higher earning category……NOT my friend who lied online and told his friends he was a big star and was going on vacation because his sales were so wonderful.
    He does not edit his books and the entire review section of 3 star ratings on down, show the truth in his sloppy book content.

    Like

    December 2, 2014

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