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It was an April Fool’s Joke!

I learned a lesson recently.

I’m a web writer, so I’m very familiar with reading tendencies on the web. And one of them is simply this: Most people won’t read to the end of your article.

They just won’t. They’re busy. They’re moving. And you’re story is full of too many words with letters that go on and on and on in the form of sentences that take up the whole page. That kind of sucks, so people aren’t going to read all that nonsense.

I’ll put myself into that category. I don’t always finish reading articles on the web.

So when a bunch of people missed my April Fool’s Joke a couple of weeks ago, I shouldn’t be surprised. And I’m not.

But I do want to clarify that I WILL NOT BE READING FROM A LIST OF MEDIEVAL LITERATURE WHEN I’VE COMPLETED THE 101 BOOKS.

I realized the joke might have gone a little haywire when several people said they were “intrigued” or “interested” in my new medieval literature adventure. They obviously didn’t read until the end of the post. That’s my fault for not making it more visible.

No harm done here, but I just wanted to make sure everyone knew that I WILL NOT BE READING FROM A LIST OF MEDIEVAL LITERATURE WHEN I’VE COMPLETED THE 101 BOOKS.

Again, I WILL NOT BE READING FROM A LIST OF MEDIEVAL LITERATURE WHEN I’VE COMPLETED THE 101 BOOKS.

What will I read? Not sure yet.

Lesson learned for next year’s April Fool’s Joke: No medieval literature.

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26 Comments Post a comment
  1. Brandon #

    So you’re saying there’s a chance….

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  2. non

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  3. tl;dr

    (which could likely also be said about much medieval lit … )

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  4. Allen #

    I suggest working through Judy Bloom’s entire catalog.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  5. I just finished The Shy Writer Reborn by Hope Clark, and your post confirms what she said: Keep it short and sweet, preferably under 500 words because people are simply not going to read long posts. They’re busy, and there’s so much more out there to read and ponder and do.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  6. Now that’s just plain waste of a good old reading list ;-p

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  7. Lucille #

    There was a great piece in the Washington Post last week by Michael S. Rosenwald that explicates how web reading rewires our brains for skimming. And the First Law of Internet should be to always pay close attention on April 1st. It may not be real.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  8. Two points: First, the promise of a serious foray into Medieval Literature is eminently commendable: you had me at Quem Quaeritis Trope. Now I hear it isn’t true and I am shattered. It is insulting that you consider the mere suggestion of reading Medieval Literature to be an obvious knee-slapper: who would even contemplate reading Medieval Literature? Sorry but your April Fool’s joke shows a sad, limited appreciation of literature and reading.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
    • Thanks Mike! Yes, I know I have a limited appreciation of literature and reading since I’ve written nearly 900 blog posts about it over the last four years. I need to do better about that.

      Like

      April 14, 2014
      • I’m impressed that you see the need for improvement. Good luck!

        Like

        April 14, 2014
  9. sally1137 #

    Dang. i’ve been brushing up on my Old English.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  10. And just when I was dusting off my old copy of Beowolf 🙂

    Like

    April 14, 2014
    • Reading Old English is like riding a bicycle: in no time at all you will be alliterating yourself through long passages of Beowulf and other 11th century delights. Just watch out for Angelina Jolie.

      Like

      April 14, 2014
  11. Oh come on…Med Lit it so FUN! All the new words to learn and love 😉

    Like

    April 14, 2014
    • It’s not only fun but by studying Medieval Literature you can experience the creation of one of the world’s greatest fictions: Christianity. So everyone, polish up your Latin and get ready for a wild ride!

      Like

      April 14, 2014
      • Christianity was created long before Medieval Lit was. It’s the oddity of high church that really gains a stronghold there.

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        April 14, 2014
    • Actually those are not new words in Medieval literature. They are very old words.

      Like

      April 14, 2014
      • And new to a person who has not read them before 😀

        Like

        April 14, 2014
    • Oui

      Like

      April 15, 2014
  12. And here I thought we were going to get saucy with Chaucer. So sad.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  13. Let me see if I get this story straight. No Canterbury Tales. No Divine Comedy. No Piers Plowman. No Beowulf. No Marco Polo’s Travels. No Thomas Aquinas and no Le Morte d’ Arthur. I was so looking forward to you insights on the Woman of Bath. Gee, it’s going to take me a whole afternoon to get over it.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  14. I know exactly what you mean. Some people don’t have the time to read the full post. That’s life but they lose out don’t they! Me and you know that’s true buddy.

    p.s. I don’t think you should read that medieval stuff next…just sayin’.

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  15. Gee, I wonder who might have not read all the way to the end……. 🙂

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  16. Hahaha! Oh, this gave me a good laugh this morning. Thank you.

    Like

    April 15, 2014

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