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What’s The Best Book You’ve Read In The Last Year?

All of us love a good book recommendation.

Except for me. You can give me book recommendations, but I can’t really act on them right now because of some stupid book list I’m reading through.

But you’re not confined to a list. You are a free reader, are you not? So this post is all about you.

Tell me and everyone else what’s your favorite book you’ve read in the last year.

Fiction. Nonfiction. Young Adult. Romance. Zombie apocalypse. Bowhunting. Absolutely anything.

It doesn’t matter when the book was published—you could recommend Beowulf if you are so inclined—but you just have to have read it in the last year. You can even give a mini review if you want to. Tell us as little or as much as you want.

This will be fun because all of us, at least you guys, will get a lot of great book recommendations from other avid readers who love a good book.

So fire away!

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116 Comments Post a comment
  1. The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes

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    April 4, 2014
  2. I only got to one book this past year (yes, only one…) and I really enjoyed it: Eden Close by Anita Shreve.

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    April 4, 2014
  3. Easy: “Washington: A Life” by Ron Chernow. LOVED it! And if nonfiction can be this good, I’ve got to get back to fiction at some point. But, like you, I got a list to get through first!

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    April 4, 2014
  4. Great idea for a post–I’m casting about now for a book that I can inhale the way I did Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch. It’s about 700 pages and so descriptive with a plot that never stops moving, which I did–couldn’t abandon it until I’d read it all in just a few days. Looking forward to getting some ideas here! Thanks for starting this conversation.

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    April 4, 2014
  5. A Prayer for Owen Meany
    The Count of Monte Cristo

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    April 4, 2014
    • Sam #

      Owen Meany is one of my all time favorites.

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      April 4, 2014
    • naenarcis #

      The Count of Monte Cristo is an all time favourite!

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      April 20, 2014
  6. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.

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    April 4, 2014
    • TrishaJenn #

      Very intriguing story! I read it years ago in high school and thoroughly enjoyed doing a book report on it.

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      April 8, 2014
  7. The Circle – Dave Eggers

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    April 4, 2014
  8. I agree, this is a great post! The last book I read was “I am the Cheese” by Robert Cormier. A beautiful psychological mess from the 70s. Loved it.

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    April 4, 2014
  9. Ashley #

    The J.D. Robb, Nora Roberts new name she’s writing under! Their her mystery romance novels about a detective who solves crimes and has one hell of a romance with a tycoon billionaire.

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    April 4, 2014
  10. Wave by Sonali Deraniyagala

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    April 4, 2014
  11. 1) Modern classic: “The Outsiders” by SE Hinton (she was only 16 when she wrote it, astonishing). 2) A newer modern classic: “Purple Hibiscus” by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. 3) Current best sellers: “The Orphan Master’s Son”, all about North Korea and storytelling, by Adam Johnson. Thank you for ensuring that for all of us free readers your blog will list even more great books to read. Nicola

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    April 4, 2014
    • Sam #

      I’m reading ‘The Orphan Master’s Son’ now. I’m glad to see you give it such high praise.

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      April 4, 2014
      • Even better if read with ‘Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in north Korea’. Together a perfect fit!

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        April 8, 2014
  12. J.R.Barker #

    I too am confined to a list, nevertheless I can highly recommend Blind Sight by Nicole Storey. It’s an awesome YA paranormal book (the first in the trilogy).

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    April 4, 2014
  13. Ryan #

    Thanks to the Tournament of Books, I picked up several good books in the last few months. My top 2 out of the 17 chosen are The Son (Philipp Meyer) and A Tale for the Time Being (Ruth Ozeki). But really, you could choose any book from the tournament and be ok.

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    April 4, 2014
  14. I don’t know if it was the best, but the one with the most staying power for me was “Life After Life” by Kate Atkinson.

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    April 4, 2014
    • Sam #

      I’m half way through it now and very inclined to agree.

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      April 4, 2014
      • Well that seems like a good tip, will order it now as i loved Nights? at the Museum when I read it yonks ago.

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        April 4, 2014
    • Lucille #

      This is one book I will definitely read again. Kate Atkinson is a brilliant writer.

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      April 5, 2014
    • This was my top book for 2013. I loved it and continue to hunk about it frequently.

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      April 7, 2014
  15. The Winter of our Discontent by Steinbeck
    Absalom! Absalom! by Faulkner (difficult but hugely satisfying)

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    April 4, 2014
  16. I’ve just finished “The Martian”, by Andy Weir. It was a quick read – a smooth blend of science fiction, nerdy science fact, and brilliant comments on pop culture. I loved it!

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    April 4, 2014
  17. Jetagain #

    “An Outcast of the Islands” by Joseph Conrad. I read this book as part of a class given by William Burroughs, the author of “Junkie” and “Naked Lunch”–a very strong recommendation!

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    April 4, 2014
  18. Evelina by Frances Burney. I took a class called “The Age of Johnson and Burney,” so it was required reading, but I enjoyed it a hell of a lot. It’s an epistolary novel with clever commentary on gender roles in the late 18th century.

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    April 4, 2014
    • I have this one on my TBR shelf so glad to know its worth reading

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      April 10, 2014
  19. “Red Mars” by Kim Stanley Robinson. Considered to be the best Mars colonisation novel ever, being very well researched so as to make it very believable. Very recommended.

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    April 4, 2014
  20. EddieB #

    Fiction – Dr Sleep by Stephen King.
    Non Fiction – Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (Life story of Louis Zamperini, Olympic and WWII hero)

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    April 4, 2014
  21. nourrivaille #

    Absalom, Absalom! by W. Faulkner; for a lighter yet emotionally charged read — 1Q84 by H. Murakami; also, an incredible work by R. Alameddine — The Storyteller (The Hakawati).

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    April 4, 2014
  22. Lucille #

    This is like asking me to choose my favorite food. But it came down to Stoner, by John Williams, a 1965 novel reissued by New York Review Books. But two other books mentioned by other readers here — Kate Atkinson’;s Life After Life and Son, by Phillip Meyers — were excellent also.

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    April 4, 2014
  23. Teresa #

    I second IQ1984. Also loved The Tiger’s wife which I reread with my book club. Last year’s favorite (and an all-time favorite) was Rules of Civility.

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    April 4, 2014
  24. Lighthearted entertaining read – The Rosie Project, Young Adult and one I’m totally loving is the Divergent series… haven’t read anything too heavy lately, getting enough of that at work!

    http://www.confessionsofabookgeek.wordpress.com

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    April 4, 2014
  25. Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn. Very intense!

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    April 4, 2014
  26. Juhi #

    The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseni. Beautiful book.

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    April 4, 2014
  27. Allyson #

    I recently finished A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra. I had trouble getting into it for some reason, but continued because it is highly praised and I enjoy his writing. By the second half of the book I was hooked. It is the most heart-achingly lovely book I’ve read in quite some time.

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    April 4, 2014
  28. deweydecimalsbutler #

    I read Atonement, and it blew me away!

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    April 4, 2014
  29. Laurie #

    The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert. It is truly a work of art.

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    April 4, 2014
  30. Ted Fontenot #

    I reread all of the novels in the Wodehouse Wooster/Jeeves series, but I guess that doesn’t count since I had read them all before. This did lead me to read, as an antidote to the inimitable first-person narrative style of Bertie, some Blandings Castle Saga stuff. Lord Emsworth and the never-ending shenanigans involving his prize pig The Empress of Blandings never fails to uplift. Two novels in the series I had never read before are Summer Lightning and Heavy Weather. Psmith’s swan song was in an early Blandings Castle novel, Leave it to Psmith, which is also highly recommended. Wodehouse not only created a unique voice in literature with Bertie Wooster’s unique style of narration, he was a master of the comic third-person omniscient.

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    April 4, 2014
  31. The Garlic Ballads by Mo Yan. The way the novel is composed shows why he is a Nobel laureate.

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    April 4, 2014
  32. Flight Behaviour by Barbara Kingsolver

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    April 4, 2014
  33. Non-fiction: Ocean of Life by Callum Roberts

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    April 4, 2014
  34. Phi by Giulio Tononi

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    April 4, 2014
  35. sylviemarieheroux #

    Hard to pin down one book… This was my top 5 for 2013:
    • Sofi Oksanen, all books
    • Per Olov Enquist, Une autre vie
    • J.K. Rowling, The Casual Vacancy
    • Ann Ward Radcliffe, The Mysteries of Udolpho
    • Margaret Atwood, Madd Addam

    So far this year: Quite enthalled with Joyce Carol Oates _The Accursed_.

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    April 4, 2014
  36. Ted Fontenot #

    Last year I read John Barth’s revised edition of The Floating Opera. Barth’s publisher in 1956 only agreed to publish his first novel if he changed the ending. It was too much of a downer, the people there thought (although, really, his second novel The End of the Road approaches the nihilistic). After becoming a big name writer with The Sot Weed Factor and Giles Goat-Boy, he forced a revised edition of TFO that reinserted the original ending. For some reason, I had never got around to reading it. That original substitute ending is less severe than the one that he intended, although it, too, is tough, but really both are intellectually satisfying in their ways. Barth is if anything pretty nimble with his thinking.

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    April 4, 2014
  37. Beaufort Falls by Mari Sloan. Rivaling Stephen King, I’d swear she stands next to him on my list of horror authors.

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    April 4, 2014
  38. “Stay Awake” and “Among the Missing” by Dan Chaon. I read four of his books within a couple of months. All four were good, but these two are his best.

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    April 4, 2014
  39. thetypographictraveler #

    Mine is a toss-up between Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson and the Article 5 trilogy by Kristen Simmons. The first is one of the most imaginative and beautifully written books I’ve ever read, and the second is a lesser-known dystopian series that is on a completely different level than The Hunger Games or Divergent (though they are okay, too).

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    April 4, 2014
  40. Denise #

    The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer by Siddhartha Mukherjee. This book was masterfully written and takes all the fear out of cancer.

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    April 4, 2014
  41. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt!

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    April 4, 2014
  42. Growing up has its own adverse impacts. I realised it when I read “Cross-Train Your Brain: A Mental Fitness Program for Maximizing Creativity and Achieving Success” penned by Stephen D. Eiffert. It seems that this guy knows every damn thing about creativity and even more about the lack of it.
    To the point, precise and a worthy investment of time, energy and money.

    Like

    April 4, 2014
  43. Ted Fontenot #

    After eschewing math and science for literature for years, since high school, I got back into it with Richard Dawkins’s The Selfish Gene and The Blind Watchmaker–almost twenty years ago now. Whatever you think of Dawkins on the religious front, no one writes about science, especially the life sciences, better than Dawkins. He’s a clear thinker and an inimitable stylist. He always finds a way for the reader to connect to his argument both intellectually and viscerally, whether it’s by using the extended conceit of the gene as selfish, or the framework of The Canterbury Tales for his opus The Ancestor’s Tale. Two of his more accessible books came out recently, and I read them last year: The Greatest Show on Earth and The Magic of Reality. Had they been around when I started reading him, I probably would have started here.

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    April 4, 2014
  44. Mary Lavin : Selected Stories

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    April 4, 2014
  45. So many good books!! My faves…..Under The Wide And Starry Sky by Nancy Horan, The Rosie Project by Grahame Simsion and a whole passel of terrific romance novels from Sarah McLean, Courtney Milan, Elizabeth Hoyt and Linda Howard.

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    April 4, 2014
  46. Patrice #

    Lottery, by Patricia Wood. This is the only book my book club has unanimously rated a “10” in our 8 year history. I would recommend it for any and every one. Charming, beautiful, makes you want to be a better person.

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    April 4, 2014
  47. Compound by S.A. Booden – or it is the most recent book I have read.

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    April 4, 2014
  48. Unearthed #

    It’s a classic, but was my first time reading it – The Lost World, Arthur Conan Doyle.

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    April 4, 2014
  49. debbierodgers #

    Dog Boy by Eva Hornung Here’s my mini-review: http://www.exurbanis.com/archives/8958#dog

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    April 4, 2014
  50. A confederacy of dunces by John Kennedy Toole. Masterpiece.

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    April 4, 2014
  51. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt – not only best book I read last year, quite possibly the best book I’ve ever read. I’ve never had a book get inside of me the way this one did; it was devastatingly wonderful.

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    April 4, 2014
  52. sally1137 #

    Still Alice by Lisa Genova. It’s a novel about early onset Alzheimer’s disease told from the perspective of Alice, who has the disease.

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    April 4, 2014
  53. I would probably say Post Office by Charles Bukowski. You’ve got some interesting looking books in that pile. I must get round to reading some Vonnegut at some point.

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    April 4, 2014
    • Elaine Sargent #

      I LOVED Post Office!!

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      April 4, 2014
  54. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

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    April 4, 2014
  55. rachelarp #

    Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell.

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    April 4, 2014
  56. Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates or The Leftovers byTom Perrotta. Loved seeing other people’s choices, particularly 1Q84 as I just didn’t quite get it (a reflection on me and not the writer in all likelihood).

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    April 4, 2014
  57. smclean90 #

    Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn, I was dying for someone else to read it so I could talk about it!

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    April 4, 2014
  58. BWB #

    Still Life With Woodpecker by Tom Robbins, although it could just be because its the most recent

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    April 4, 2014
  59. Into Thin Air, by John Krakauer

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    April 4, 2014
  60. The Bible!

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    April 4, 2014
  61. I am not sure where to start. I have been reading a lot of health and nutrition books. My favorite authors are Dr. Fuhrman Dr Junger J.J Virgin Jo Robinson Dr Amen and Michael Pollen. They all truly inspire me to change my lifestyle and my life and my family’s life is so much better. It is wonderful the knowledge that books can hold and we all can gain that knowledge.

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    April 4, 2014
  62. Better late than never, I read and loved Olive Kitteridge.

    Liked by 1 person

    April 4, 2014
  63. First, I AM confined to a list, as I am also on a quest to read 100 novels. http://100greatestnovelsofalltimequest.blogspot.com/
    I know ALSO isn’t precise since you are reading 101, and I’m only doing 100.

    Second, I am going to cheat. I will still confine myself to choose from the last 12 months, but that’s too easy, as Lord of the Rings just happened to fall in this 12 month period, and it just happens to be my favorite book, of all time (Prof Tolkien originally intended it as one book, the trilogy was the publishers idea). For the same reason, I’ll exclude To Kill A Mockingbird, as it might be my second favorite. So, I’m going to limit myself to something I read for the FIRST TIME.

    I have to go with Atonement by Ian McEwan. Early on I thought I was going to dislike it. There is a terrible injustice, and there seems little hope of it ever being set right. The title gave me hope, and in spite of not being fully satisfied with the outcome, McEwan still closes with a sense of hope and triumph that I found enjoyable.

    Can I throw in my least favorite? I’m cheating anyway, what can you do to me? A Clockwork Orange.

    Like

    April 4, 2014
  64. I have three. One of the funniest novels I’ve read in a long time:”The Cigarette Girl” by Carol Wolper; “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood & the Prison of Belief” by Lawrence Wright, a thoroughly researched, balanced in-depth history of Scientology; and “Bark”, Lorrie Moore’s latest collection of short stories. If you love short stories, Moore’s new book is a sure bet.

    Like

    April 4, 2014
  65. Two completely different books, but both stand out for me in my most recent reads. The classic novel Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier and the YA book The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

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    April 5, 2014
  66. I review books on my blog, and there were two books that I rated a 10/10 that I read last year, and a third that would have but I didn’t give an individual rating to.

    Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes is one of the best books I’ve ever read, a fantastic example of the different ways we look at people around us and the differences between emotional and academic intelligence.

    The second book is The Willow Tree by Hubert Selby Jr. I had read this book years ago, and both times upon finishing it I’ve been blown away by the story, easily the best story about the redemption of a person’s life I’ve ever read.

    The last book (that didn’t get a rating) was A Memory of Light, the 14th and final book in The Wheel of Time series started by Robert Jordan and finished by Brandon Sanderson. I love big Fantasy books, and this series is about as big as it gets. This book is 909 pages, and I read it in one day. Even after finishing it, I’ve gone back from time to time and re-read some sections. This is one of my favorite series of all time, and these books are a very large part of the reason that I read today, it’s a large time investment to read all the books, but well worth it.

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  67. I just really enjoyed re-reading Fitzgerald’s ‘Tender is the Night’. Over the course of the last year, the other books that really stood out for me were: ‘Pride and Prejudice’ by Jane Austen and ‘My Family and Other Animals’ by Gerald Durrell. You can find my reviews at http://www.novelreading.wordpress.com

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  68. Not sure it’s possible to pick just one so here’s a top five.
    1. Slaughterhouse 5 – Kurt Vonnegut
    2. Levels of Life -Julian Barnes
    3. Complicity – Ian Banks
    4. The City and The Pillar – Gore Vidal
    5. Brides head Revisited – Evelyn Waugh

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  69. This is hard!! I guess I would say, The Sandcastle Girls by Chris Bohjalian and Tuesdays With Morrie by Mitch Albom!

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  70. thedotage #

    Narcissus and Goldmund by Herman Hesse.

    Like

    April 5, 2014
    • Good choice. After reading most of Hesse’s work starting this year I was going to also add Narcissus and Goldmund.

      Like

      April 7, 2014
  71. The Orenda by Joseph Boyden!

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  72. You’re asking me to pick ONE favorite book from the last year? Hahaha! Oh boy. I have a bunch, but I’ll go with Golden Boy by Abigail Tarttelin. I just read it last month and it is FANTASTIC. Highly recommended.

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  73. The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker and Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer.

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  74. Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin.
    I don’t think any review I can give would do it justice, other than this: I was hooked.

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  75. Homage to Catalonia by George Orwell

    Like

    April 5, 2014
  76. I devoured the Hunger Games trilogy…but I can’t decide whether ‘The Hunger Games’ or ‘Catching Fire’ was my favourite of the three!

    Like

    April 6, 2014
  77. My favourite book from the last 12 months was ‘The Narrow Road to the Deep North’ by Richard Flanagan.

    Like

    April 6, 2014
  78. ScoopBrown #

    ‘Never saw it coming’ by Linwood Barclay. My mum introduced me to Linwood’s books a few years ago and the crime/thriller genre was a refreshing change for me from the always-predictable rom coms I had been indulging in. Linwood’s easy-to-read style, strong background details and his ability to build the plot to a can’t-put-it-down crescendo is captivating. Give him a go!

    Like

    April 6, 2014
  79. A couple people have already said it, but definitely Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch. Read it a while ago, but I’m still thinking about it.

    Like

    April 6, 2014
  80. My fave was After Tehran: A Life Reclaimed, by Marina Nemat. It was the 2nd half of her two part autobiography, with the first being Prisoner of Tehran.

    I’m going to be lazy here and just copy the 2nd book’s blurb, which explains both quite well:

    In the International bestsellar Prisoner of Tehran, Marina Nemat chronicled her arrest, torture, and two-year imprisonment in Iran’s notorious Evin prison at the age of sixteen. Yet her journey was from over.

    After Tehran is a moving account of Nemat’s struggle to overcome her past and break the silence about her detainment. Following her escape from Iran, she builds a new life in Canada with her husband and infant son. But Nemat is haunted by survivor’s guilt. She feels increasingly compelled to speak out about what happened to her in prison, even if it means revealing the painful secrets she’d much rather forget. As her riveting story eventually becomes a bestselling book, Nemat’s life is forever changed. She gains the strength to confront her past, re-engage with her distant father, and emerge from the emotional ravages of post-traumatic stress.

    Her story is one of courage and recovery, an amazing tale of resilience written by a truly inspiring woman.

    Like

    April 6, 2014
  81. ceornell #

    The History of Love by Nicole Krauss

    Liked by 1 person

    April 6, 2014
  82. “Black House” by Stephen King & Peter Straub – a superb mix of supernatural suspense, plotting and character exploration

    Like

    April 7, 2014
  83. well I never had patience to read novels but gave a try.. and finished some fantastic novels around.. like the monk who sold his Ferrari, and best among Agatha Christies – five little pigs, and then there were none

    Like

    April 7, 2014
  84. Infinite Jest. I know it’s a love-it-or-hate-it thing, but all I could think was, “What kind of mind thinks like this?”

    And yes, I read every single footnote and laughed all the way through ;o)

    Like

    April 7, 2014
  85. Best book of 2013 (for me): Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino. I liked it so much that I blogged about it.
    Best fiction book I’ve read in 2014: Fire and Hemlock by Diana Wynne Jones (again, that’s why I blogged about it).
    Best children’s book: A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness.

    The Little Locksmith by Katharine Butler Hathaway, for those interested in a very introspective memoir of a disabled author – beautiful language.
    The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan, for those interested in reading a nutrition/health foods book.

    I haven’t read that much recently released fiction lately. These book recommendations from other people are helping me tremendously! Recognizing a lot of the titles, so I haven’t been completely living under a rock.

    Like

    April 7, 2014
  86. The Vinci Code -By Dan Brown. :-p .Yeah i know, i am a bit (totally lying) late to have actually read this,but “kudos” to myself for finally putting it down. Other than that read Part -1 of Sherlock Holmes(Novels and Short Stories), will be opening up part -2 in a little while.

    And you would have been tired of reading this day after day but still, GREAT BLOG,and this is one of the first blogs i followed, since i signed up,KEEP IT UP.

    Like

    April 8, 2014
  87. Me again, did’t actually read your statement properly,just hooked myself onto favorite book read recently,rather than favorite book book from last year,that would be Girl With The Dragon Tattoo Trilogy by Stieg Larsson.

    Like

    April 8, 2014
  88. Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen

    AMAZING!!!

    Runner up…
    The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson

    Like

    April 8, 2014
  89. If you love reading books you may be interested in some unique items that I make from recycled books. I create book purses, tablet device covers, hollow books, invisible bookshelves, IPhone and IPod dock stations and clocks.

    Like

    April 9, 2014
  90. I’ve read the first two trilogies in the Thomas Covenant series. They might be my favorite pieces of fantasy I’ve ever read. Although I admit they’re not for everybody. I wrote, I wouldn’t call it a review, but something about it on my blog. It was one of those books or series that you need to write about after you’re done.

    Like

    April 9, 2014
  91. No contest, my answer is Zola’s L’Assommoir. It’s as good as Germinal which I would have thought hard to beat.

    Like

    April 10, 2014
  92. No one is here except all of us by Ramona Ausubel. It is so quiet and powerful at the same time! A must read! http://www.madelienerose.com

    Like

    April 11, 2014
  93. It’s difficult to choose. I thought “A place of safety” by Hillary Mantel (historical fiction) was as complete a literary experience as you can get. But Zadie Smith’s “White teeth” also gripped me from word one. For a very short and eye-opening experience I’d recommend “This is water”, a David Foster Wallace speech.

    Like

    April 12, 2014
  94. marvin sharpe #

    I read a lot of fiction last year but actually the best and most inspiring thing I read was a business book called Business Storytelling for Dummies. http://juststoryit.com/
    Reading that book and taking it’s advice on board has totally changed my life at work and had a huge impact overall to my people skills.

    Like

    April 12, 2014
  95. Let The Great World Spin by Colum McCann…gorgeous, excellently written, very, very, very hard to put down!

    Like

    April 14, 2014
  96. Hazel #

    The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown – fantastic true story about the USA rowing team that competed for a place in the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. Superb and you don’t have to be a sports fan to enjoy it – a book to be treasured.

    Like

    April 20, 2014
  97. Reblogged this on agentbaure's Blog.

    Like

    April 21, 2014
  98. Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office: 101 Unconscious Mistakes Women Make That Sabotage Their Careers by Lois P. Frankel, Ph.D.
    It should be recommended reading for all adults and you don’t have to be in corporate America or a woman to learn from the “mistakes.”

    Like

    April 24, 2014
  99. Thinner Skin, by Billie Diersen

    Like

    February 1, 2015
  100. pAnonymous #

    Definitely. The.Luciferian.Doctrine (i.e. The.Most.Important.Knowledge.You.would.Ever.Read.Implement.and.Live.up.to.Forever) @ [ww.]foreverthemostimportant[dot]com/The.Luciferian.Doctrine.pdf (free eBook).

    Like

    February 26, 2015

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