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Faulkner’s Advice For Reading His Novels

I guess this means I need to read The Sound and the Fury three more times to get it.

Crap.

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From The Paris Review’s interview with Faulkner.

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20 Comments Post a comment
  1. Jacque #

    Love it.

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  2. That’s great!!!

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  3. Lucille #

    Good answer. A lit professor once told my class that in order to understand a poem it was necessary to read it three times, one of them out loud. Maybe an out-loud third reading of Faulkner would solve the mystery.

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  4. Reblogged this on D.e.e.L's Writing and Various Nonsense.

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  5. 1wyrdsmith #

    I love this!! So glad Faulkner could have a sense of humor about his style – he is certainly not for everyone. (Me included!)

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  6. Reblogged this on literaryboners and commented:
    Faulkner is a badass, but do you think this mentality holds up given the abundance of content on the Internet today? Do you think people will still wade through tough works, when there are so many attention-grabbing headlines promising instant gratification?

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  7. Honestly, I don’t find Faulkner’s style too intimidating. I just don’t think one should expect to understand the nuances of every single sentence or even paragraph. His prose just flows right into me, so from my standpoint, the meaning is not always the point. A bit like some art, no? (Also, Wikipedia does help, if worse comes to worse).

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  8. ploxo303 #

    I would read something not for 4 times but thousands of times if the person who made it is complete genius and enlighted (in every way)! I will not read some poem, business books or some analysis pieces more than 3 times because there would be no sense in doing so!

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  9. Reblogged this on Mark Tuminello and commented:
    What answer was that interviewer expecting?

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  10. I am biased on this one. I LOVE “The Sound and the Fury” and “Absalom!Absalom!” but I was 40 years old and returning to college to get an MFA when I read them (yes, three times each). I was an engineer as an undergrad, so I got ZERO liberal arts classes the first time around. Taking a class on Faulkner, another on Joyce, and others including the Romance poets, was like being a cat in catnip. I rolled around in the stuff for three years and loved every minute of it.

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  11. Love it! I love Faulkner, and I’m going to give this quote to my AP Lit kids 😉

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  12. Great quote, but he’ll never be my cup of tea no matter how many times I try.

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  13. ha! I’m inclined to greatly admire him, while also thinking that he must be an asshole. Why does his work deserve to be read 4 times just because it’s hard to comprehend? That’s not really a question aimed at Faulkner specifically, but more of a general observation about difficult-to-understand books. Granted, sometimes more difficult books are worth reading because they are challenging & change our world view, but other times I think the writer just gets wrapped up in their own so-called “genius” and intentionally obfuscates his or her meaning. And the latter practice frustrates me greatly.

    Like

    February 3, 2014
  14. Reblogged this on Master Mindz Afrika (NGO) @EmmanuelOdufejo.

    Like

    February 4, 2014
  15. dcapic #

    Reblogged this on Da Bears.

    Like

    February 4, 2014
  16. In my experience, many “classic authors” are unreadable. Faulkner is near the top of this pile. To suggest otherwise is the first step to booksnobdom (sweet word eh?).

    Read it four times? Hey Mr. Faulkner, didn’t your dad tell you to do your job right the first time?

    Like

    February 4, 2014
  17. Champagne for the merciless #

    Faulkner: “Hemingway has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.”
    Hemingway: “Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words?”

    Like

    February 5, 2014
  18. Reblogged this on sarahremy.

    Like

    February 8, 2014

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