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Next Up: Money

You know, I’ve read several novels during this adventure that have made me feel like showering afterwards.

There’s Lolita, Portnoy’s Complaint, Dog Soldiers and Deliverance. And I still have novels like Naked Lunch and Tropic of Cancer left to read.

It’s just the burden I bear for 101 Books. So it’s not surprising that another shower-inducing novel has come my way. This one is Money: A Suicide Note by Martin Amis.

I don’t know much about this one, except that it’s a pretty dirty read. Hooray.

Wish me luck.

Here are some quick facts about Money and its author, Martin Amis.

  • The novel was published in 1984.
  • Money is based on Martin Amis’s experience as the scriptwriter for the film Saturn 3.
  • The character, Lorne Guyland, was based on Kirk Douglas, who in turn starred in the eventual film version of Money. Art imitating life imitating art?
  • Money was adapted into a television series for the BBC in 2010. The adaptation was broken up into two parts.
  • In 2008, The Times named Amis as one of the 50 most influential British writers since 1945.
  • Amis’s two best-known novels are Money and London Fields. He’s also written more than a dozen other novels, countless short stories, one screenplay, and several pieces of nonfiction.
  • Amis, 64, moved from London to Brooklyn in 2012.

The good thing Money has going is that it’s satire, and you guys know I love satire.

More about Money and Martin Amis in the coming days.

Have you read it? Any thoughts?

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20 Comments Post a comment
  1. I read this in the mid 90’s and LOVED it. I really don’t think anything Amis has written since lives up to it. Look forward to hearing what you think.

    Like

    January 23, 2014
  2. For the record, I thought the BBC adaptation was awful…

    Like

    January 23, 2014
  3. It’s a hell of a book – I read it while I was at college, and it’s always stayed with me. The writing is top notch, and Amis plays fast and loose with the idea of being a writer. My favourite of his books, better than ‘London Fields’ (which is itself a remarkable piece of work)

    Like

    January 23, 2014
    • I’ve read 50 pages and that’s the sense I’m getting. He definitely plays fast and loose. Love the tone of his writing.

      Like

      January 23, 2014
  4. read this about 15yrs ago, and wished i hadn’t- not because of any particularly bits, but just generally because of the whole tone as well as the content. Maybe I missed the satire, maybe I read it on the wrong day. It was easier to read than Naked Lunch, which is just barking mad by about 2/3 of the way through… I just didn’t like it.

    Like

    January 23, 2014
    • I’m early in the book, but it reminds me a little of what a grown up version of Holden Caulified from The Catcher in the Rye would look like. Similar tone.

      Like

      January 23, 2014
      • maybe i need to go back to it- I’ve read The Catcher in the Rye a couple of times and enjoyed it…
        hmm, now you’ve got me thinking…

        Like

        January 23, 2014
  5. Reblogged this on dunjav.

    Like

    January 23, 2014
  6. Teresa #

    I’m thinking you may have a love-hate relationship with this one. You’ll love the satire, like the fast paced action, but have trouble with some content. This is another book I couldn’t understand being on the list at first. I get it now but did not like it at all. However I did like Tropic of Cancer, while dirty it was gentler. Money is on steroids.

    Back to your review of Day if the Locust. I’m with you on being tired of depressing books. I’ve read 82 books on the list, but stopped a year ago. Whew! At this point I’m waiting for you to tell me which of the rest are worth it. I guess I’ll cross Locus off the list.

    Like

    January 23, 2014
    • You hit the nail on the head with the love-hate thing. I’ve already experienced that after just reading 50 pages or so. Love the tone and style, but the content at times is a bit much.

      Like

      January 23, 2014
  7. I was extremely entertained by Money. I had never heard of Martin Amis or the book, but around 5 years ago I decided to read through this exact same list (didn’t have the awesome idea of a blog, though!) and I loved this particular book. I thought it was hilarious! I’ve not made it through the list yet because I take extended breaks to read other things, but I do come back to it every once in a while. I’m reading The Adventures of Augie March right now. Can’t wait til you get to that one so I can get your take on it!

    Like

    January 23, 2014
  8. K. #

    I actually read this about a month ago. It was not as “dirty” as I was expecting. Right now, probably *the* dirtiest book I ever read was a Henry Miller. Amis doesn’t even come close. I’ve read “Lolita” too, and while it’s dirty…we’re not talking the same kind of dirt.

    The ending is really good. And the writing’s not bad, but I don’t think it ever made me laugh out loud. Honestly, I give the book about a 6/10. I just was expecting so much more than I got. I can’t think of too many friends I’d recommend it to–but I’m still looking forward to your review! =)

    Like

    January 23, 2014
    • It will be interesting to compare Tropic of Cancer and this one when I’m done with both. On the scale of “dirtiness,” they have to be pretty high.

      Like

      January 23, 2014
  9. Liz #

    I remember really enjoying it but in terms of plot I remember London Fields better. He’s on the short list of authors I’m determined to read all their books.

    Like

    January 23, 2014
  10. You left one thing off the list. Martin Amis is Kingsley Amis’ son. I think the talent was genetically transmitted.

    Like

    January 23, 2014
  11. L’ha ribloggato su Dentro il cerchio.

    Like

    January 24, 2014
  12. michaelcboxall #

    Amis’s biting wit is on full display in The Moronic Inferno, a 1986 collection of journalistic pieces about America. “Everyone is pretty sleek and well-rounded in Palm Beach, unlike New York, where people’s faces are as thin as credit cards.”

    Like

    January 27, 2014

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