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Why I Disagree With Critics Of The New Gatsby Film

I missed the boat.

I missed the boat filled with people who believe the new Gatsby movie sucked. That ship sailed and I wasn’t on it. I don’t know what’s up with those people.

In this post, I’ll explain why I disagree with most critics on The Great Gatsby movie. The film has been critically panned, receiving 49% on Rotten Tomatoes. I’ve read several recurring arguments online, and I want to take a look at each of those.

As a reminder, I’ve read the Gatsby novel five times. It’s my favorite book, and if a director did a crappy job of putting Fitzgerald’s story on screen, I would be more than happy to ridicule said director.

In this case, I think Baz Luhrmann did a (mostly) excellent job of making this classic novel into a Hollywood film. But let’s take a look at what some of his critics are saying.

The movie is over-the-top.

To the critics who say this about the film, I have one question: HAVE YOU READ THE BOOK? The first half of the novel is almost entirely dedicated to Jay Gatsby’s over-the-top, lavish lifestyle—the parties, the scantily-clad women, the money, the house, the excess. It’s all over the top.

Jay Gatsby’s lifestyle was OVER THE TOP, even though he was never in the middle of the social frenzy. Baz Luhrmann nailed that angle of the novel. The party scenes were dazzling. The house was magnificent. Everything about these people’s lives, these people who orbited around Gatsby, was over the top.

The special effects were irritating.

I’m inclined to agree with some critical reviews on this one. Some of the effects, like handwritten graphics flowing on to the screen while characters move in the background, seemed like something out of a low-budget Hallmark movie, not a film like this one.

There were a few cheesy, dream sequences. It just seemed like Luhrmann could’ve chose a different, more effective way to present that information. That said, the movie was bright and beautiful. The colors popped. Even small details, like Gatsby’s yellow car, were bright and beautiful. It’s another way the production of the movie reflected the story itself, in my opinion.

The modern music was distracting and inappropriate for a film set in the 1920s.

This has been totally overdone. The way people have talked about the music, you might think half of the movie involves Gatsby and Daisy hanging out backstage at a Jay Z concert. Or you might think Gatsby takes the mic and drops a karaoke version of “99 Problems” during one of the party scenes.

But no. You’ll probably hear five total minutes of “modern” (mostly rap) music in this film as a background.

And, to me, it fits where they’ve placed it. The key question here is: Why must a movie set in the 1920s have a soundtrack and background music that precisely reflects that era? Have we ever heard of anything called a “modern spin?” Open up your minds a little, people. Eventually, Victorian furniture falls apart–that’s why we have IKEA.

Leonardo DiCaprio was great, but everyone else was forgettable.

Dicaprio was brilliant as Gatsby. I don’t know if you could find another living actor that could pull off that role like he did. He acts with equal portions of charisma and crazy, and that’s what you need to portray Gatsby.

To me, the next biggest role in this film wasn’t Daisy—it was Tom. And Joel Edgerton absolutely NAILED this part. He was exactly how I imagined Tom during all the times I’ve read The Great Gatsby. Seriously, he had to match DiCaprio on that role, and he did. He portrayed Tom’s brutish, racist, womanizing role down to a T.  The scene in the Plaza Hotel was one of the best movie scenes I’ve witnessed in years.

I thought Carey Mulligan was a solid Daisy, much better than the actress (and, honestly, more attractive) who played her in the 1970s movie. Much has been said of Tobey Maguire as Nick Carraway—mostly negative. But I think it worked. Nick is a forgettable, everyman character. He’s just a guy who’s there. That’s Tobey Maguire, right?

I saw one reviewer criticize Maguire because he was just a “prop” in this movie. Again, READ THE BOOK! Nick is a prop for Gatsby. Almost all of the people in this novel, excluding Tom, are Gatsby’s pawns. If Macguire seemed like a forgettable prop in the movie, then maybe that’s because he did an excellent job of portraying Nick Carraway.

The framing device (Nick in an asylum) was weird.

I’ll agree with this critique. Not only was it weird, but it was too much a part of the movie and it set up all the hokey, special effects flashbacks and handwriting motion graphics that I criticized above.

I understand why Luhrmann used this framing device, but I think there could have been other ways to incorporate it without making it such a recurring part of the film.

The film glamorizes Gatsby’s lavish lifestyle and misses the point of Fitzgerald’s novel.

Again, I feel like I’m in an alternate universe. Did we watch the same movie? Yes, Luhrmann glamorized Gatsby’s lifestyle. That’s because Gatsby’s lifestyle was glamorous. Fitzgerald did the same thing. The first half of the novel is centered on Gatsby’s over-the-topness.

But, then, about halfway through the movie—and at a similar point in the novel—the story takes a dark turn. The parties stop. Gatsby’s obsessive pursuit of Daisy reaches new heights.

In the end, you’re left with Gatsby’s dead body in a pool. The “careless” Daisy and Tom running off together, and Nick left picking up the pieces in the rain at a funeral where no one shows up. It’s a sad, pathetic ending and a reminder of how empty you can feel even when you’ve reached the “American Dream.”

It’s a reminder of just how fickle that American Dream is, and how fragile love can be. All of that was there in the film, just as it was in the novel. Did the critics just miss the last hour and a half? This is a depressing story. It glamorizes nothing.

Honestly, I think a lot of critics just don’t like Baz Luhrmann and were already predisposed to dislike this movie before it came out.

The content is there. The story is there. All the meat of Fitzgerald’s brilliant novel is right there in the 2 hours and 20 minutes that The Great Gatsby is on screen. Was some of his technique distracting? Sure. Was the movie perfect? Absolutely not.

But I think a lot of critics missed the forest because of the trees on this one. If anything, this movie is worth seeing for the acting alone. DiCaprio and Edgerton are THAT good.

So, again, I missed the boat here. I loved the film and totally plan on seeing it again in the theatre.

I’ll give The Great Gatsby 4 out of 5 martini glasses.

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78 Comments Post a comment
  1. An interesting point about the music. You point out that the critics think modern rap would be inappropriate for the 1920s. However, they never comment that orchestral music as we know is thus inappropriate for anything set before 1600s. “Gladiator”, “Robin Hood”, etc all have the standard orchestral chore from what I remember rather than a soundtrack of that time. If you really, wanted do go further into it, they wouldn’t be able to use any form of dissonance or harmony either.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • Great points. I don’t get it. Like I said, the music thing has been totally overplayed.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
  2. oh, glad you liked it so much. I was disappointed when the terrible reviews came out. I trust your judgement on this one, and will definitely watch it when it comes out here in India.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  3. I have not seen the movie but have seen bad reviews. I have read the book many times and will see the film with an open mind. I would rather it stick with the Jazz music of the era but understand why they went with more modern music. Thanks for the review

    Liked by 1 person

    May 14, 2013
  4. I love this post and would love to share it on my blog. I think you make amazing points. Awesome read!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  5. I completely agree with you! I really enjoyed the movie, with the exception of the framing device and some of the 3-D effects. I think Luhrman did a great job capturing the essence of the novel, which is no easy job. Critics need to lighten up.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • I agree. Like I said, I think a lot of critics just don’t like Luhrmann and that’s what it comes down to.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
  6. Reblogged this on I Be Readin! and commented:
    Loved this post! I am looking forward to seeing the film, and this review gave me some insight to it. Hope you enjoy as much as I did!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  7. It’s interesting that the scathing reviews I’ve read are by American critics, while the Canadian Globe and Mail gave it a great review. Made me thing Americans put this book on a pedestal (Great American Novel, right?) and no movie treatment would ever be good enough.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • I haven’t noticed that, but great point.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
  8. Ayin Calderon #

    Reblogged this on From the 90's and commented:
    Reblogging this because I want to know more about the story.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  9. I went to see it with an open mind and just did not like it. I was so disappointed. Toby as Nick was very distracting for me and got on my nerves and Leo’s portrayal was very good but his affected voice was also too much and I get it was supposed to be affected but it still grated on me. The special cartoon like, Hallmark effects were also too much for me. I liked the trailers much better than the movie and perhaps with better editing would have enjoyed the film much more. I am glad you and many of my friends did like it, because let’s face it, the book is so wonderful!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • Sorry, you didn’t like it, but man I loved it! Thought Leo, voice included, was outstanding.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
      • Hey Robert, what do you think about the Nick character? I always felt in reading the book that he was gay and that was a contributing factor to him being an observer looking on. Thoughts? I know you are a aficionado of the book so that is why I am curious as to your opinion.

        Like

        May 15, 2013
  10. I haven’t seen this yet (I’m dying to go, despite most reviews), but I think you’re onto something with the comment that “a lot of critics just don’t like Baz Luhrmann and were already predisposed to dislike this movie before it came out.” Luhrmann’s style is so distinct, and it seems people either love it or think it’s ridiculous. Personally, I’m in the former group and that’s why I can’t wait to see the film. Great review!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • That’s what it comes down to. It’s too “different.” If you’re a traditionalist, you don’t like “different.” That’s why a lot of critics dislike him.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
  11. Denise #

    I think the idea of using rap, a current edgy music, is to sink the audience into that then-edgy jazz scene. For pop audiences, jazz is now dated, and the use of rap music brings in the sense of danger and excitement that jazz was known for in the 20’s. This I understood from the previews, and I can’t wait to go see the film as well.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  12. ireinatty #

    1. Simply because Jay Gatsby was an over-the-top kinda guy, does not make Fitzgerald’s narrative garish. In fact, in the book, I absolutely love the delicate color of Fitzgerald’s tone contrasted with the content. The medium of the movie was much too flashy, not the parties.

    2. The score of a film is one of the most influencing factors in tone. This score went ahead to take the flashy baton, and bludgeon the audience with it. Modern spin or not, it lessened what the stunning visuals and acting were doing.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • I disagree. I’m not a fan of flash for flash’s sake, but I thought it served a purpose and matched the tone during the first half of the story.

      And I totally disagree about the music. Nowhere even close to “bludgeoning” the audience. As mentioned above, and as Baz Luhrmann himself said, the rap music of today reflects the spirit of jazz music from the 20s. That’s why he chose it. I pretty much hate rap music, but it was hardly noticeable to me. Regardless, it’s a few minutes of music scattered throughout a two-and-a-half hour movie. Hardly a bludgeon.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
      • ireinatty #

        I am not talking about rap, or the abundance of it. I am talking about the whole score and how it related to the moving picture. What I think bludgeoned the audience is the quality of the music, not how often it shows up.

        And rap does *not* in this time reflect what jazz was in the 20s. It’s not about “danger and excitement.” It is the sexualization of heartache.A mingling of a severe darkness and a lighthearted overtone–which is the exact same feeling the novel in question conveys to the reader. No other music genre does this, because of the context in which jazz was created: the 20s’ attitude (excluding jazz not produced in the 20s).

        I don’t hate rap, being a musician I appreciate the qualities it has to offer, and know full well its essence and the tone it brings forth to a listener. This tone is extremely ill-fitting to The Great Gatsby. Maybe my opinion is much too stuffy and anti-modernization, but I think this particular choice of music hindered the depiction of the 20s which was so central to the work.

        Like

        May 14, 2013
        • My misunderstanding. A large majority of the music we’re talking about in the film was rap music, and that’s what I referred to in the post, so that’s what I thought we were talking about.

          We’ll just disagree. I’m not a musician, but I know this book like the back of my hand and I have no problem with the selection of the music as a minor compliment to the movie. Even so, the movie did include a lot of period music as well.

          Like

          May 14, 2013
          • ireinatty #

            I don’t mind disagreeing. I enjoy this blog (and enjoyed reading this post) regardless.

            Like

            May 14, 2013
          • Fair enough. Thanks for reading!

            Like

            May 14, 2013
  13. yakalita #

    Happy to see this film reviewed from a literary perspective. Can’t wait for it to be released in South America so I can make my own judgments!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  14. The Great Gatsby is also my favorite book and I was thrilled when I heard this movie was coming out. But, when the blasting reviews started, I wasn’t sure I should see it. I ended not going on opening night (as I originally intended). However, the next day I decided I needed to make my own judgment and went to see it. I’m so glad I did.

    I left the movie wondering much the same things you did…. did these people who are giving it scathing reviews *read* the book? Or maybe the last time they read it was in high school 30 plus years ago? I thought the movie was brilliant. Of course, not perfect, but what is?? So many of the negative prattle about the movie was regarding the music. However, I thought the music was a remarkable interpretation of the atmosphere of Gatsby’s parties! The parties were so far beyond the norm, the music needed to be beyond the norm! The music in this movie had a 1920s feel, but the modern twist provided a “texture” that expressed the uniqueness and edginess of the Gatsby party experience. The house/setting was magnificent, just as Gatsby’s house should be… in the book, the parties were almost like a dream, the house was extravagant, and the guests indulged in the luxury of everything Gatsby provided. The movie rendered this brilliantly.

    DeCaprio was incredible. He showed the multiple and sometimes contrary dimensions of Gatsby …. debonair and eccentric… confident and fretful… sane and insane…. Tobey MacGuire was flawless as Nick Caraway , quiet, subdued, controlled. Joel Edgerton gave a brilliant performance Tom, so true to the book that I don’t think I would change a thing. I could go on…. But the bottom line is the movie was beautiful, luxurious, expressive, and interpretive.

    I am so glad I saw it and I urge others to ignore the Negative Nancys out there and go see it!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
    • Great insight. I’m glad you went to see the movie. I’ve learned to rarely trust movie critics.

      Like

      May 14, 2013
  15. I think you hit the exact point on why I felt Maguire was best for playing Nick. I dislike Maguire as an actor, but I also was never a fan of Nick in the book. As a “prop” for Gatsby, like you said, Maguire did an excellent job.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  16. Thanks for this. I was thinking about not going to see it due to the bad reviews!

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  17. youaremyworldx #

    i have seen the trailer for a million times or something.. 😉

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  18. I have only seen the trailer in the theater while waiting to see “42” with my son. I think I’ll wait to see it on Netflix specifically because of the music. I hate feeling assaulted by sound in movie theaters (am I getting old??), and the soundtrack volume was way over my limit. I am trying to be open minded about music choice, but the trailer makes one assume that the entire soundtrack is going to be modern and ear-splitting. Even my 9-yr-old son said it was too loud. Anyway, like I said, Netflix it is.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  19. get.out.of.my.head. this review is EVERYTHING I thought about the film. I really liked it except for the few relatively minor things you’ve mentioned. the biggest problem with it was the way they had Nick in the asylum. I am reblogging this. thank you so much for writing this.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  20. Reblogged this on words in scarlet ink and commented:
    This review is everything I thought about the new ‘The Great Gatsby’ film. EVERYTHING. I really liked the film, with a few, relatively minor exceptions that the author mentions.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  21. I haven’t seen the film yet, but F Scott Fitzgerald is my favourite author and having read the reviews I was wondering whether I would be better leaving the images of Daisy and Gatsby that I have in my head, there untarnished by the film. But having read this, I think I’ll give it a go this weekend. Thank you.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  22. I largely agree with your review of the film. Like you, I think a lot of the hate comes from Luhrmann being controversial and not limited to the confines of the movie. If anything I felt that this was Luhrmann’s best work because he finally found a story that was accented by his style (the lavish visuals match the lavish atmosphere). In a film like Romeo+Juliet, it was harder to explain.

    The music wasn’t as big of a deal as a lot of critics made it out to be but I do find it becoming a troubling trend (I wrote about this on my blog if anyone is curious). The film industry has given up pieces of its creative freedom to advertisers in many areas and it seems like the soundtrack is now up for grabs. By no means am I saying that the whole soundtrack was a shameless plug or that it harmed the film noticeably, but Jay Z essentially bought his influence in the film and the number of his songs (and the attention on screen they get) speaks volumes.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  23. I only read the Great Gatsby late last year. I thought it was great. I am not a fan of Baz Luhrmann, so I do not know if I will get round to watching this film.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  24. Fantastic summary. I was shocked to read the film has received only 49 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. IMDB has it at 7.5 stars which I thought was too low. It deserves at least an 8.5! DiCaprio nailed Gatsby, and Luhrmann created a film that I thought Fitzgerald would be proud of. There aren’t many movies based on books that I like as well as the books themselves, but this is one of them. Thanks for this summary. I’m going to share this on my blog.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  25. Reblogged this on Writing Red Baron and commented:
    Nailed it. I also agree with the “four out of five martini glasses” rating.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  26. Nel #

    I’ve yet to see the movie, so take my comments accordingly, but the modern music strikes me as completely appropriate. 1920’s music sounds so cute and nostalgic to modern listeners; it just doesn’t have the edgy feel it would have had when it was current because so much time has past. I think modern music helps create a better atmosphere than period appropriate music would have done.

    Like

    May 14, 2013
  27. authorsherysenoelledubose #

    Thank you for the review. I’m ready to re-read the book because honestly I haven’t since high school (fortunately, I still have my copy) and then go see the movie.

    Like

    May 15, 2013
  28. Joy #

    I plan on seeing it this weekend, but feel the same way you do about the reviews on this one already. Baz Luhrmann is someone you either love or hate as a director I think…I love him …as he can reinterpret literature in film in a way so that the content is intact, but it feels completely new. A real auteur. Thanks for the great review!

    Like

    May 15, 2013
  29. I haven’t seen the movie yet but after seeing the negative reviews I’m glad to read a positive one because I was really looking forward to this movie. I agree with you on the 1970’s version. Mia Farrow was horrible in that role. By the way,I nominated you for an award. You can find the details in this post: http://melissajanda.wordpress.com/2013/05/15/more-awards-im-not-worthy/

    Like

    May 15, 2013
  30. Brilliant review for a brilliant film!

    Like

    May 15, 2013
  31. Reblogged this on layselautnere comentado:
    Ansiosa

    Like

    May 16, 2013
  32. THANK YOU! I totally agree with your critique. There were parts of it that were gimmicky (the text really bugged me as did the asylum frame narrative, but overall I loved it! Also, I read that Luhrmann really wanted to use music that represented shifting contemporary culture (i.e. hip hop is today’s jazz). I thought it was clever, and the movie was STUNNING. I’d totally see it again. DiCaprio and Edgerton squared that away on their own.

    Like

    May 16, 2013
  33. I am currently in the process of writing up my review of the movie for my own blog after seeing it in cinema today, and I agree with pretty much everything you say about it. I actually went into the cinema today expecting to dislike this film, but was pleasantly surprised… I thought it was a great interpretation, and I myself am giving it a 4 out of 5. Great review (with that I compliment both you and myself!)

    Like

    May 16, 2013
  34. The only thing I saw wrong with the movie was the music. It was distracting. My issue was that I can remember dancing to those same tracks at the club not 2 years ago.

    I think I’d not have had a problem with completely original tracks (though I wouldn’t know who I’d want as the composer) even if they sounded 21st century. It immediately dates the movie, and I think it’ll get more distracting on re-watches in 10-20 years.

    Like

    May 17, 2013
  35. Ah, I’m so glad to read your post here! As another huge Gatsby fan, I have been SO looking forward to seeing this film for months, but the fairly lukewarm reviews recently had somewhat dampened my enthusiasm. Anyway, my wife and I are due to see it tomorrow evening (it’s only just been released here in the UK), so it is not long now before I get to see for myself!
    Thanks for sharing your views here.

    Like

    May 17, 2013
  36. I agree with you on most points. after reading the reviews, I was surprised with how good the movie was. You can read my opinion here: http://coverrated.com/2013/05/20/monday-review-the-great-gatsby/

    Like

    May 20, 2013
  37. I really felt the movie was terrific. I agree that the portrayals of Tom and Jay were fantastic. I actually liked the asylum framing for the movie. I think it worked and made sense. It was like Moulin Rouge in the hind sight reflection and the words on the screen; those aspects did not reoccur enough to be too bothersome. Overall, the rendition was very well done.

    Like

    May 20, 2013
    • Sam #

      I was reading through the comments hoping someone would link it back to Moulin Rouge. The modern music didn’t surprise me one bit.

      Like

      December 10, 2013
  38. Aino A Järvinen #

    Spot-on critique for a well-developed art piece.

    Like

    May 21, 2013
  39. I really enjoyed the movie as well, and the music was actually the only thing that I wasn’t a fan of. It wasn’t because of any particular problems I have with the presence of modern music in there, but more along the lines of being unable to pick up on what the actors were saying because Jay-Z’s voice repeating “hundred dollar bills, hundred dollar bills” commands a whole lot of attention.

    I think it all comes down to sound editing. If you can make that music work in there organically, well, right on. But if you take everyone out of the movie because of the weird lip-syncing or the dancing that’s not lining up properly, or the extremely recognizable hook and chorus that are obliterating the dialogue…that’s where we have a problem.

    Like

    May 21, 2013
  40. Dragonfly #

    An excellent adaptation of an excellent book. I loved everything about it, even the strange 3-D effects (though I understand your POV), although I felt DI Caprio could have smiled a bit more. (Did Fitzgerald not put emphasis on Gatsby’s grin or am I making that up???) Other than that, it was a perfect performance.

    Interesting points made about the music, though I felt it also helped to reflect on the current economic situation, especially as a reflection of the boom-before-the-crash.

    Like

    May 28, 2013
  41. Reblogged this on Stilettos + Stethoscopes and commented:
    As an individual who has read The Great Gatsby a grand total of five times, I feel the need to share this. The movie was phenomenal and I completely agree the with critiques expressed above. Wow! It’s so nice to see that other people actually enjoyed the film.

    Like

    June 1, 2013
  42. Reblogged this on perpustakana museum sejarah jakarta.

    Like

    June 2, 2013
  43. Smudgey Paw #

    I LOVED reading this post – nail on head! ….now to share with all those that I’ve been having healthy debates with about this movie….

    Like

    June 3, 2013
  44. I absolutely agree with you. I was stunned when I heard people didn’t like it. Book adaptation aside, it was truly beautiful, so cinematography geeks like me could enjoy it on that level alone. And as you said, I thought it captured much of what I imagined while reading the book (much better than my AP Lang discussions did way back when). I was really pleased with the soundtrack. It’s an American classic, so it was a perfect tie in to modern life. And it’s not like they were twerking or anything.

    Like

    June 9, 2013
  45. Badger #

    I hated “Moulin Rouge,” but when I heard that Luhrmann was going to direct a new Gatsby movie, my first thought was that he would probably be the perfect director to do it. The novel needs those saturated colors and almost music-video style that he does so well.

    (Random thought – why didn’t any of those music video directors back in the heyday of MTV use Great Gatsby as an inspiration?? Those parties would have fit perfectly with the Big 80s conspicuous consumption!)

    I haven’t seen the movie yet but intend to do so.

    Like

    August 16, 2013
  46. I must admit I am not a Baz Luhrman fan. I have seen all his movies and they always have great art direction. Julie Taymor is like that. But the substance of the story gets lost. And this one is no different.

    Like you, I love The Great Gatsby. I have read it at least ten times and always get a kick out of it. Unlike you, I didn’t believe Toby Maguire as Nick Carroway and Leonardo DiCaprio as Gatsby. They just didn’t work for me. And the longer I watched the more I disliked both. Toby Maguire just didn’t seem old enough for the Carroway role. And DiCaprio seemed to be trying way too hard.

    The problem is that The Great Gatsby is a character study. I think Fitzgerald realized that about halfway through and threw a plot in the second half. Also I came to realize that the book really isn’t about Gatsby. The character arc belongs to Carroway. Gatsby never changes but Nick does. Just my opinion.

    Like

    October 23, 2013
  47. The Great Gatsby is one of my favorites as well.
    My critique in a nutshell: Redford played it too close to the vest (he was boring. The pacing of that whole movie was strange) DiCaprio played it too over the top. In general, I don’t enjoy the frenetic style of that filmmaker. However, you make valid points which make me want to watch it again.
    I may also need to reread the book to determine how I think Gatsby should be played, but I enjoyed your post and mostly agree. 🙂

    Like

    March 7, 2014
  48. Blair #

    The Film sucked!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    It’s the 20’s! OK! Mindless dribble rap crap was not a part of the 20’s scene! This was a era of people who did not fall for mindless dribble! I watched it and it was ok until the first rap crap song! Then I hit forward until it was over, then again another mindless rap crap song! And after the third rap crap song I pulled out the DVD and cracked it into two and threw it away! This is BS! Whats next another Buddy Holly movie with him rapping? WTF? Wake up people!

    Like

    December 17, 2014
  49. The ones who complain about this movie didn’t understand a thing about this book. I was pleased with the soundtrack. If it was just jazz or some classic songs it would’ve had an old film appeareance instead it had a vibrant, full of life and a ‘present feel’. Not for us, but for the characters. It’s perfect!
    It would be meaningless to watch a movie from a ‘past’ perspective. The movie was alive, the characters were alive and everything as well matched my vision. I wish I could use words much better than this because I really liked ‘The Great Gatsby’. Every character was well chosen.

    Like

    January 31, 2015
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    March 7, 2017

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