Skip to content
Advertisements

What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing

William Faulkner once said, “[Hemingway] has never been known to use a word that might send a reader to the dictionary.”

Hemingway responded: “Poor Faulkner. Does he really think big emotions come from big words?”

No surprise here if you’ve read my review of The Sound And The Fury, but I stand in Hemingway’s camp on this one. To me, the best writing is clear, simple, and to the point.

That’s why I think anyone who writes web copy, whether it’s a blog, an article, and especially any form of marketing content, should look long and hard at Hemingway’s writing style.

As a guy who spends all day writing for the web, I’ve probably been subconsciously using Hemingway’s style for years. With that, here’s what I think Hemingway can teach you about writing for the internets.

Short sentences are swell. This doesn’t mean you need to write like a second grader: “I like vegetables. They are nice.” The point is that a sentence riddled with 8 commas, a semicolon, and a couple of em dashes doesn’t make for a pleasant web reading experience—even if it’s grammatically sound.

Short paragraphs are even better. I’m amazed at how many websites with great content choose to format a 600ish word article into four long paragraphs. In web speak, those are “walls of text,” and they are painful to read. There’s no quicker way to lose a reader than to have giant blocks of text on your page. Your eyes need a break. Paragraph breaks are your friend. Use them!

Short dialogue is pretty cool, too. Hemingway was the master of engaging short dialogue. If your copy includes dialogue, consider this type of conversation from The Sun Also Rises as an example to follow:

“How did you go bankrupt?” Bill asked.

“Two ways,” Mike said. “Gradually and then suddenly.”

“What brought it on?”

“Friends,” said Mike. “I had a lot of friends. False friends. Then I had creditors, too. Probably had more creditors than anybody in England.”

“Tell them about in the court,” Brett said.

“I don’t remember,” Mike said. “I was just a little tight.”

“Tight!” Brett exclaimed. “You were blind!”

“Extraordinary thing,” Mike said. “Met my former partner the other day. Offered to buy me a drink.”

“Tell them about your learned counsel,” Brett said.

“I will not,” Mike said. “My learned counsel was blind, too. I say this is a gloomy subject. Are we going down and see this bulls unloaded or not?”

“Let’s go down.”

Short articles are a great option. This isn’t a hard and fast rule. Most of my posts are in the 300-400 word range, with the actual book reviews running about three times that long. It’s all about context and expectation. Some writers can get away with writing enormously long content because they have a dedicated audience who reads their work religiously and expects it. But, as a general rule, the shorter you can make your articles/posts (while still making your point), the better. At least that’s my opinion.

Subheads are also super cool to use. Okay, Hemingway didn’t use subheads. But, in a way, he did. Instead of subheads, he wrote short chapters as another way to give the reader a breath. Subheads are simply bolded “mini titles” that allow you to make easier transitions and break up your copy. They’re usually better suited for longer articles. And, honestly, I’m terrible about using them. But Brian Clark at Copyblogger isn’t. He wrote a great piece about subheads.

In sum, the web has made us all ADD.

According to Neilsen Norman, the average webpage visit lasts less than a minute. We read a few words of an article—maybe even just the headline—and if it doesn’t pull us in right away, we’re on to something else.

That’s why the above tips are important. You can have the best content in the world with awesome advice and powerful insight, but if you make it hard to scan and difficult to read, no one will read it.

I know I’m not breaking any new ground here. These tips aren’t anything you couldn’t read over at Copyblogger or many other sites on the web.

It’s just that Hemingway was on to this stuff long before any of us. He knew how to keep readers engaged with his writing, and as he so aptly told William Faulkner: Big emotions don’t have to come from big words (or sentences).

Well said, Ernest. Well said.

(Image: Wikimedia Commons)

Advertisements
265 Comments Post a comment
  1. Great article, Hemingway taught us a lot. Thank you for pionting out the wisdom between the words.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  2. Yes to all of this! As a creative writing student in college, my professors pretty much ingrained in me that I should “show” rather than “tell”. A lot of classic literature (Faulkner, Hawthorne and Dickens come to mind), goes the way of telling for me. I don’t need all the long sentences and paragraphs, nor the flowery language. Just get to the point!

    Like

    April 4, 2013
    • I took a literary translation course, which also included a creative writing part, and the teacher told us exactly the same thing, and made us do it, again and again. One of the exercises was to write about something you liked, making people understand why you liked it. The following week you had to write why you hated that same thing. It was very interesting.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  3. When I first read “A Farewell to Arms”, i didn’t really like it. So I didn’t finish the book. A couple of years passed, I picked it up again and just adored it. I think what changed in my perspective was that I got used reading those incredibly descriptive paragraphs with lots of unfamiliar words. Hemingway gave me an alternative. Since then, I really try to make things concise with my writing. However, I do see the need for using certain words (even lexical ones) for specificity and exactitude, and also metaphors and the like at times.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  4. Sound advice, Robert. It’s ironic how everything we think of as new and fresh (i.e. web writing) has really been mastered before, just under another name. I enjoy following your posts and shared this one on my blog board on Pinterest. Thanks for sharing compelling content!

    Like

    April 4, 2013
    • Thanks for sharing, and thanks for reading the blog!

      Like

      April 4, 2013
  5. I agree that paragraphs shouldn’t be too long, although I also dislike how so much web writing has gone to one-sentence paragraphs. I think too short (just as in sentences) is as ineffective as too long.

    And yeah – Hemingway beats Faulkner any day in my book.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  6. Reblogged this on This is a Clever Blog Title and commented:
    Thank you, Hemingway.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  7. leafstrewngirl #

    Reblogged this on leafstrewngirl and commented:
    I love Ernest, and this has always been my philosophy, even though I need to do it more often!!

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  8. Good advice here! Liked it a lot.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  9. This is great advice – I’m with you in the Hemingway camp. A great way to look at web copy.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  10. As a wordy person, I constantly keep Hemingway’s writing style in the back of my mind. He says what he needs to say without becoming ‘flowery’, and it is just as effective. Glad I found your blog!

    Like

    April 4, 2013
  11. I have trouble calling one style superior to another. If an author can pull off wordy sentences and flowery prose in a way which complements his/her story, I can enjoy it just as much as more concisely formed writing.

    Like

    April 4, 2013
    • I wouldn’t call either superior in general, but I obviously prefer Hemingway. What I’m saying is that Hemingway’s style is better suited and more appropriate for web writing.

      Like

      April 5, 2013
  12. Hey I enjoyed your post and I love Hemingway. but two notions in brief; I believe this simplicity comes after an extremely hard work. It’s a precious achievement at the end of the way, but disastrous if it appears at beginning!
    And two; your assumption implies that you differentiate between the so called content and the form, while in my eyes they are the same… I forget to add that I also love Faulkner!

    Like

    April 5, 2013
  13. Beautiful article! Hemingway is a great teacher!

    Like

    April 5, 2013
  14. “This doesn’t mean you need to write like a second grader: “I like vegetables. They are nice.” The point is that a sentence riddled with 8 commas, a semicolon, and a couple of em dashes doesn’t make for a pleasant web reading experience—even if it’s grammatically sound.”

    And this is how the decline of the English language begins. People learn to write by modeling themselves after the works of others. Just like you are modeling your ideas about writing for the web around Hemingway, so too do others model their writing style after authors like Henry James or H.G. Wells. Why give in to what you yourself say, “the web has made us all ADD”? I think to promote Hemingway’s style for the sake of how people read on the Internet is largely misrepresenting how his style of writing works. While brevity plays a significant role in conveying our ideas clearly, that does not mean we should sacrifice length for the sake of some readers who click at the next distracting link found flashing in their face on the sidebar of the website. These distractions are another issue entirely; rather, the complexity of the idea should be what dictates whether someone writes using concise sentences or more verbose ones. Distractions on the web should not be the grounds on which we lose sight of how we write to our audience and certainly not to “dumb it down” because of the layout of a website.

    I agree that we can learn from Hemingway and his conciseness, but it should not be for the sake of losing sense of what it means to write. In my opinion, the problem moreso lies in how “8 commas, a semicolon, and a couple of em dashes” are viewed by the common writer. Most people find proper punctuation use to be incomprehensible. Yet, language is a system with stylistic rules in place for the sake of clarity and meaning. The necessity and importance of punctuation is often lost with writers found on the World Wide Web because they have either lost sight of these rules or they are not taking their writing seriously. Furthermore, anyone teaching the old adage “When in doubt, leave it out” is doing an injustice to the systematic role of punctuation and the impact it has on meaning. To say what you do above is hinting in this direction, and this is where I do not agree with you.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • Hear, hear. If all web pages were to go Hemingway, we would be the poorer for it. Great writers should master both short and long form, concise and complex expression. Here’s an example. The opening sentence of Moby Dick is “Call me Ishamel.” The fourth sentence reads: “Whenever I find myself growing grim about the mouth; whenever it is a damp, drizzly November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily pausing before coffin warehouses, and bringing up the rear of every funeral I meet; and especially whenever my hypos get such an upper hand of me, that it requires a strong moral principle to prevent me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knocking people’s hats off – then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I can.” Both sentences are masterpieces and they could not be more different.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
      • I agree.
        Constructing well written, scenic, meaningful sentences which do not teeter – or run – into run-on sentence structure is an artform. Most authors and writers cannot accomplish this especially on a consistent basis. For those who can…Write on!

        Like

        April 7, 2013
      • David #

        Excellent example! I’m reading Moby Dick right now.

        Like

        April 7, 2013
        • Thanks – I’ll admit though that putting Moby Dick up as a blog post would probably not work!

          Like

          April 7, 2013
          • David #

            No kidding. I love Melville, but his style can be excruciating at times.

            Like

            April 7, 2013
      • Melville was using the semi-colon as a sentence break. It is much more common to use it that way in Britain than America.

        IMHO.

        Ghost.

        Like

        April 9, 2013
    • I agree. Language is limiting enough without imposing more restrictions. I am all for clarity. Unless I am not. Some of the best “points” are better thought of as a “mood” or an “atmosphere” which can’t always be conveyed so concisely.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
    • Truly good writers start with the understanding of what good writing is. I think the old adage “you’ve got to know the rules before you break them” is true.

      I’m not saying Hemingway’s style is the end all be all of writing, but I’m just saying I think it works best in this medium. And I’m not saying sloppy, loose punctuation and writing is okay. That obviously wasn’t Hemingway. This isn’t about adopting a lazy, loose style…it’s about knowing your format and choosing the type of writing that works best for that format. You can disagree, but a lot of research and study has proven that a lot of the above works best for keeping readers engaged.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  15. i rilly like it

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  16. Short sentences certainly move the pace along, and I think sometimes that’s necessary. However, I just find I’m a long sentence kind of person. I also really like big words! It’s not that I disagree with all the things we can learn from Hemingway, it’s just that it’s not my writing style.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • To each his own! You’ve got to write the way you feel led to write.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  17. simple writings are the most difficult to find or execute, yet the most appealing. thank you for sharing these wonderful pointers. i try to not get swathed (see again, i mean carried) away by the big words but end up doing so, many times.
    hail hemingway!!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  18. I’m going to be attempting to write some horror flash fiction later this week. I’m going to have to keep all this in mind when I’m writing it. Who knows? It might help me keep the word count under 700 words.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  19. R. #

    Simplicity is not exclusive of “big words.” Using these tools at the right times and in the proper context won’t necessarily send people running to the dictionary, at least not right then and there, but they simplify writing by presenting the precise thoughts the writer is trying to convey.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  20. Your post reminds me of that old expression “Stand up, speak up, shut up.” which can equally be applied to web writing. A useful reminder. Thanks!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  21. I loved this. My surname aside one of my guiding principles in my own blog was to try and use ‘Papa’ and his style as an influence on my writing style. I keep trying !
    Let me know what you think http://www.paulhemingway.wordpress.com if you get a minute or two

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  22. Very good. I agree: I like reading short posts as opposed to long posts.

    Speaking of short posts:

    “A Short Hitchhiking Trip”
    http://hitchhikeamerica.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/a-short-hitchhiking-trip/

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  23. Wow, very true and very handy. Thanks for sharing!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  24. Poke My Mon #

    Reblogged this on Poke My Mon and commented:
    Great post. Also, I need to keep in mind the whole “keep it short” thing. Commas are my best friends and also my worst enemies.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • Nothing wrong with commas, but a lot of them in one sentence can definitely give a choppy feel.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  25. alexanderschimpf #

    This was very helpful–thanks!

    I would also add (for those interested in fame and glory) that writing short, clear sentences makes it far easier for your work to be translated!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  26. Just my two cents worth on Hemingway and Faulkner: I thought Hemingway’s “The Sun Also Rises” and “The Old Man and the Sea” were excellent; I thought Faulkner’s “As I Lay Dying” was one of the most original pieces of American literature I have ever read.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • Agreed on both of the Hemingway works. Haven’t read As I Lay Dying, but wasn’t a big fan of The Sound and the Fury.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  27. The web hasn’t made me AD…ooh look! A new post!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  28. Great article! The good old marketing KISS (Keep it simple stupid) is applicable to the web too! 🙂

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  29. Ah, this was pretty smart. However it made me quite sad to read that people only stay at one website for under a minute. This really makes alot of effort feel like it is for nothing. People today seem to be too busy to really enjoy what is precious in life, be that online or not.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  30. Great advice! I’d like to add one more point and that is, when writing for the Web keep in mind that you are writing for a worldwide audience whose first language is not always English. The simpler and clearer the writing, the easier for your audience to comprehend and/or translate.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  31. I just started my very first blog this week and called it “Santiago’s Boat” in honour of “The Old Man and the Sea” – a reference to the beauty and simplicity of that most profound of stories… and the honour and integrity of the simple life that it presents.

    You speak a lot of sense Robert. When I think about the relative verbosity of my first couple of posts I really wish that I could strip it back like Hemmingway… instead of tying myself in knots all the time. This post has inspired me to try and reconsider my writing.

    Was wondering if you were familiar with the works of Georges Simenon? 400 or so Novels and the ability to knock out 60-80 pages of crystal clear prose in a single day! I read an interview and it seems that his only ever form of drafting was to go back and cut out absolutely anything that he considered extraeaneous to the story. No metaphors or similes, or purple chains of adjectives and adverbs… just the bare minimum of necessary description. And irony of ironies, I think his work is some of the most wonderfully enveloping and evocative I’ve ever read.

    Am a quarter of the way through Proust’s “Lost Time…” at the moment, so you can imagine how much I’m craving the simplicity of a Hemmingway.

    Sorry if I’m rambling (defeating my own purpose). It’s just that this post really struck a chord!

    Thank You

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • Thanks for reading. I haven’t read his work but that does sound really interesting.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  32. Reblogged this on growing in smarts and growing in love and commented:
    The man knew what he was talking about…

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  33. Someone who has read nearly every single word written by Hemingway and published, I do agree with your piece. That said, Hemingway’s writing is more inspirational than imitable. Who else could have said this more pithily: ‘For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can’?

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  34. Great advice! One thing I noticed specific to WordPress is once you appear in “Reader,” no matter what category, your first line must be a doozy. If you use a photo in your headline, it’s usually kept, but I’ve had complete headlines dropped as a result. That’s why your first sentence or two must be an attention grabber. Thanks!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  35. Great post! Being concise is something to which I aspire.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  36. I love Hemingway, and agree that the best writing is the easiest to read. Writing can capture emotions hidden within that don’t need to be spelled out in order to get the root of it down. I myself have a travel blog, and have a hard time keeping each post under 2000 words. I write as simply as I can, but the details that I’ve latched onto just need to be put down into the written word. The web is making us all ADD, but my audience seems to be dedicated and enjoy the experiences that I share. Check it out below! And congratulations being freshly pressed, from a fellow alum!

    http://www.theadventuresofadr.wordpress.com

    Best,
    Dan

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • Thank you! One way to get around long posts like that is to possibly break them up into a series of posts. That might help.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
  37. Very informative 🙂

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  38. Very useful information.
    “I’m learning” he said.
    “Great. Now shut the hell up”, she replied.
    😉

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  39. thnkx for the learning!!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  40. It comes from rules of Journalism. Get to the point. Write so your readers can see it. That’s where Hemingway learned to tell stories.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  41. Reblogged this on youthlike and commented:
    a old man with his infinite sea

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  42. Love Hemingway and love this article! Each of the tips you suggested sound like tips for news writing, which is what I do. I suppose that news writing and web writing are in a similar boat: the goal is to look interesting and easy to read (attraction), then worry about keeping the reader engaged. Thanks!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
    • That’s exactly it. As a reader mentioned above, Hemingway got his start as a journalist, so it makes sense that he would continue to use that style in his fiction.

      Like

      April 7, 2013
      • I had no idea Hemingway started in journalism! What a fun fact. I think I might have a new role model. Thanks again!

        Like

        April 7, 2013
  43. Well said you, as well. You spelled out the approach I didn’t realize I had!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  44. I agree with this. I try to always keep my writing under 500, anything longer and readers’ eye start to glaze over. I know if I’m reading an article and it goes on and on, I lose interest, no matter how great the writing is.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  45. I’m glad I use these in my blogs. It’s a lot easier to keep a reader’s attention by given them an image to look, switch their gaze to a bolded phrase or add a little humour.

    I agree completely on your methods. We’ve been boiled down to 3min videos and 30sec commercials. Some of my friends can’t listen to a whole song cause it’s “too long”

    Excellent post!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  46. What a coincidence, I have a good friend who is a Public Affairs chief for a major car industry. At a party yesterday we discussed how effective Hemingway writing would be for my new blog. I swear on my kids life this really happened. Great article.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  47. Whoa! Going back to rewrite my blog now.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  48. cjaynes1295 #

    Great post! I’m a fan of Hemingway so it was interesting to see blogging compared to his writing style!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  49. anniedm778 #

    Simple done right can resonate. Hemingway was one of the best. I enjoyed reading the book “Girl With the Pearl Earring” too. Simply written but so much said between the lines.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  50. I think a lot of writers forget that big and rare words can be used in creative ways (character and place name for example… think of ones like “borgin” used by Rowling in her children’s books). Big, fun emotions and themes backed up by effective rhetorical devices and figures of speech will always win out against cacozealotry.

    Still… I do find it fun to dip into the more obscurely formulated and abstruse texts from time to time… like faulker. Nice post!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  51. Thank you! Great info!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  52. Hemingway would be proud that you used his writing style !

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  53. This is interesting, because these were all the reasons people thought putting a great deal of writing on digital sources would never catch on. But we just changed the way we wrote.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  54. Yes yes yes! As an author, I completely agree with Hemingway. He was many things, and ultimately a very flawed man, but he will always be one of the greats. With the advent of MFA programs, many writers are writing from the thesaurus, not from the heart.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  55. Fantastic article and advice. I’ll definitely try some of those dialogue techniques. Thanks for posting!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  56. Great post. Excellent ideas. Thank you!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  57. jolly2012 #

    Remember, Hemingway was a journalist before he started writing novels. More precisely, he was a war corespondent. He learned how to distill the overwhelming horror of war in the space of a newspaper column. I think word choice, and impact, are important here. The shorter the piece, the more impact each word makes, if it is chosen wisely.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  58. Great article! You are exactly right about the internet making us all ADD.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  59. Agreed! In the blogging world, you can have amazing content but if it’s too long-winded, people may not have the patience to sit through it!

    That being said, I enjoy writing longer blog posts because I get so wrapped up in the details!! Brevity is not my strong point! I could do with taking a leaf out of Hemingway’s book.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  60. Dagny #

    Short sentences, short paragraphs and simple language- I agree with them all. They do make for easier reading.

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  61. Sage advice, thank you!!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  62. Great article and very wise advice. Thanks!

    Like

    April 7, 2013
  63. riseofdawn #

    Yes, I do agree with you, the Internet has made sure to perpetuate ADD. Being pedantic by using confusing words does make one feel as if one is being excluded from the “intellectual club” and it is refreshing to read the style you write in; straight and to the point. It’s all we have time for these days and leave a longer impact.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  64. Hemingway is one of my favorite authors and I think this post was extremely insightful.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  65. As much as I love the literary excellence of classics,I equally admire a writing that is simple and clear,which I believe,is my style of writing too.Thank you for this post.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  66. Reblogged this on M2wa2 DigiTech..

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  67. I believe it comes down to knowing your audience and knowing yourself. Start with yourself. Write things YOU’D want to read, ignore all critics. Pick subjects that stoke your fire and bring them to life in the style of writing that flows most easily from your fingertips and fits most snugly into your own ear when spoken aloud. Pretending to be something you are not does not elevate you or afford you any degree of professional security. It’ll wear you out in the long run and you will grow to hate your editor. Wallpapering another writer’s style over your own is a waste of genius: yours. If your editor doesn’t agree, you haven’t found the right editor yet.

    Think about your audience. Don’t think about changing your writing style to suit the audience you desire. Think about what type of audience your current style is attracting. If they aren’t what you had in mind, either change your mind or change your self. Your writing will naturally reflect the new place you are coming from just as effortlessly as it revealed where you were before. Meanwhile, your exquisite individual art will always shine through in little glints here and there, the foundation of who you are as a writer will remain. It is the whole point of being alive. So many renowned artists’ fame and fortune began with the words, “I don’t give a @#&%! what everyone says, I’m doing it THIS way!”

    In a nutshell, if you feel personally frustrated and disempowered by the short attention span clan of the internet, you are not hanging around the right sites. The whole point of the internet is that it can connect you to anybody. How will your true fans find you if you are pretending to be Hemingway?

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • I think you’ve misinterpreted what I’m saying. I’m not saying to pretend like you’re Hemingway or lose yourself in trying to be someone else. All I’m saying is that Hemingway can teach us a lot about writing good web copy. If we can’t learn from the great authors, then whom can we learn from?

      Like

      April 8, 2013
      • I get you, I was just waxing poetic, inserting some extra thoughts. Thanks for the opportunity. Very thought-provoking post.

        Like

        April 8, 2013
  68. Reblogged this on Kafe Bug.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  69. I couldn’t agree more. Every time I click on a blog and it uses really small font and HUGE paragraphs, I am immediately put off and inclined to skim rather that closely read. It’s just too much work.

    The best writing is clear and concise. And I agree that subheads are a great idea… In short, way to go Hemingway—and you!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  70. has anyone read the short story “in another country”? if no, read it, it will teach you a lot about writing.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  71. interesting, thanks

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  72. Reblogged this on Jeannot Muller.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  73. northernmalewhite #

    Hemingways dialogue was terrible and the major weakpoint of his writing – apart from making all his characters dislikable awful people, that and being very repetitive over his career.
    To suggest using his style when writing marketing is one of the most absurd things i’ve ever read.
    And Faulkner was the superior writer.

    thanks

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • Awesome. Thanks for commenting. But I totally disagree on your comment about marketing. Hemingway’s style is perfect for marketing. Long-winded, wordy copy littered with punctuation is the antithesis of good marketing copy.

      Like

      April 8, 2013
      • northernmalewhite #

        Writing is the anti-thesis of Marketing.

        Like

        April 8, 2013
  74. Thanks for sharing!!!!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  75. Paro #

    Ah the massive paragrahps..That is one thing that definitely makes me stop reading and switch to the next thing.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  76. Great Piece! I tend to mix it up between short and long paragraphs and I never let the word count affect what I’m writing. Nor do I find keeping the wording simple as a goal either. I tend to let what I’m writing about set the tone for that. There is a time to say; “Her manner of dress accentuated her magnificent bosoms.” and there is also a time to say; “She dressed to show off her great cans.” I’ll finish with one last thought. There is a time for Faulkner and a time for Hemingway… 😉

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • Can’t disagree with you there. I just think, for the most part, the time and place for Hemingway usually involves web copy.

      Like

      April 8, 2013
  77. Reblogged this on The story so far and commented:
    Learning from Hemingway

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  78. Well said

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  79. i have not read a book since wuthering heights in school, i am 45 now but to compensate i enjoy films twice as much. for whom the bells toll! i wonder if i read hemingway would i be brighter,more romantic and so on. i would like to tell a story which is common but my refusal to read is only surpassed by refusal to write,,,,,catch 22 also a good book no doubt!
    i wonder who could solve such a conundrum,,,i have always relied on the kindness of strangers!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  80. Keep your audience in mind. The point of writing is to communicate, yes? If your reader doesn’t understand what you’ve written … you’ve failed.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • northernmalewhite #

      no-one should write for their audience.

      Like

      April 8, 2013
      • You must not do a lot of magazine writing. Try sending a piece about NFL football to a home and garden magazine.

        Like

        April 8, 2013
        • northernmalewhite #

          Very good.

          Like

          April 8, 2013
  81. Not sure if Hemingway would approve of web writing.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  82. Really nice article!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  83. Reblogged this on maryfranceinmelbourne and commented:
    Hemingway would blog? Maybe.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • I think Hemingway would be blog. He never seemed to be at a loss for something to say and seemed enjoying saying it for people to hear… Just ask Faulkner… 😉

      Like

      April 8, 2013
  84. thiagogm #

    Very nice post. Hemingway have been on my read list since my recent visit to Montmartre in Paris, where he lived for a while.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  85. Hemingway is one great writer of all time…

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  86. Great post! I absolutely agree that more concise sentences are better. It’s a real skill being able to say exactly what you want using only a few words. I’m a student of Spanish and I always find it funny how much longer sentences are in this language. It uses connecting words and relative clauses much more than English does. Thinking about it, this must have been an absolute nightmare for Hemingway’s Spanish translators…

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • You’re right. It’s much more difficult to be concise, because word choice means so much more and you have to really think long and hard about what you want to say rather than just spilling a bunch of words on the paper.

      Like

      April 8, 2013
  87. The Sun Also Rises is my favorite Hemingway novel and one of my favorite novels period.

    I am often encouraging my psychology students to write shorter sentences and shorter paragraphs – and to use subheadings. Hemingway’s advice and yours apply equally well to technical writing and term papers. Sometimes you have to use words there that most people would have to go to the dictionary to understand, but that just makes it even more important to simplify sentences and stick to one topic in each paragraph.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  88. Valerie #

    I totally agree. With as many blogs as I read, I prefer fairly short posts, when appropriate. I always do the same for my readers as well. If I can’t keep it short, I turn it into a series and let my audience know there will be “x” amount of posts about the same topic, to come. 😉

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  89. Great article, thank you.

    Just regarding your first and last points. I think sometimes what Hemingway exceptional, was his occasional failure to acknowledge literary instruction i.e. very long meandering sentences, or the lack of chapters in ‘The Old Man and The Sea.’ I completely accept your points above though.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  90. This is a good read, thank you for the tips on writing, I plan on using your hints to further my own blog. Once again, I thank you.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  91. Great advice. Great advice. Cheers!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  92. Such good advice. Thank you. I tend to use big words, but most of my material is cited. It takes careful thought to use bigger words, to formulate a to-the-point sentence, and to make your point at the same time. I try to inform my audience in one way or another what material they need to prepare to read, and what is for fun. 😉 The content is awesome in this one. Thanks again.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  93. actually writing short, concise, to the point is not as easy as it sounds. i learned it first from writing my own thesis and how my tutor taught me how to slash repetitive and unnecessary content of a writing. and why a thesis has a specific requirement about max amount of words you can use. it’s helpful. until now, i’m still in the learning process to write short and engaging at the same time without leaving the beauty of words themselves, especially on the web. it’s just different from writing for a printed matter. thx for sharing the tips!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • Definitely not easy. That’s the hard part about good writing. Saying a lot in as few words as possible.

      Like

      April 16, 2013
  94. thanks for sharing… definitely things to remember when writing

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  95. Oh, geez. I tend to be a long-winded, blithering, blabbering rambler when I write. I’ll keep this advice in mind. Many thanks for the post.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  96. Excellent post.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  97. Duncan Miller #

    Reblogged this on e-literate and commented:
    Great example on how to keep web copy simple.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  98. These are all the great guidelines I’ve learned in some of my public relations writing classes. All so true and so helpful!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  99. The web has made us ADD! Great point.

    I think part of that is there are so many BAD blogs out there we don’t want to waste our time. I have been reading many blog posts on Burma and the Philippines lately as I’m planning a trip to Asia later this year. I am amazed at how poorly some of them are laid out, even those with excellent writing.

    Great post and congrats on being freshly pressed.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  100. Yes, that’s true. And I am also into Hemingway’s works and style. The short stories are specially amazing.

    However, there are books which convey emotions with other kind of writing, and we shouldn’t forget that. I think that mastering a simple style is extremely difficult, but it could be still more difficult to catch the attention and use correctly the words with a complicated one. As a result, it’s easier to happen that a simple style is actually better, just because the complicated one is not good enough because of its obstacles.

    All in all, I generally prefer simple styles but full of quality.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
    • It’s all about the medium. Other styles are fine, but in the context of the web, I think this style is most effective, though of course there are exceptions.

      Like

      April 16, 2013
  101. Great Article. I like the way you expressed these things. No one can do this better.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  102. this is quite interesting, about hemingway. i am not much familiar with his books beyond “the old man and the sea” and “the snows of kilimanjaro”. but i certainly do appreciate laconic style. i have tove jansson and anton chekhov as my role models of literary simplicity. curiously enough though i do admire salman rushdie, as well. and he just happens to be the exact opposite 🙂 i wonder how his blog would read.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  103. Delighted to find that I do follow most of Hemingway’s (your) advice already. Not the Subheads though. They were obviously before both of our times. Off I go to read said post.

    Many thanks for this and congrats.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  104. Great advice here! I also agree totally about Hemingway. I read all of his books, but was hard pressed to make it through even one of Faulkner’s!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  105. Mmmm, Hemingway. . . Now I want to go to a cafe and drink some wine. A nice wine. A wine that is cold with beads of condensation on the bottle. While I drink, I will fish, or perhaps take in a bull fight. Have you ever entered the contest where you write one sentence in the style of Hemingway? You have a nice post and some good advice here.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  106. Some readers don’t know that Hemingway did much of his work as a journalist, (which is what I do for a living.) Every news journalist learns to write tight, clean copy, often in “inverted pyramid” style (the most essential material at the top, easily chopped from the bottom by hurried, harried copy editors.)

    If you can’t write tight and bright, read some newspaper copy (those dinoasaur-y things no one reads anymore) to get a better sense of it.

    Better still, work for a newspaper or wire service demanding quick turnarounds of excellent material. It IS a skill, after all! Bloggers often forget that.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  107. I haven’t read much Hemingway, and I’m not likely to. I’ve read “The Old Man and the Sea” along with some mandatory reading for school here or there. I found the shorter readings to be choppy, but some of that may have been that it was in excerpts rather than in full. “The Old Man and the Sea” infuriated me though. I found the entirety of the book to be repetitive and dumbed-down. A story that short usually takes me a few hours to read, but that one took me nearly a week. And that old man repeated himself via paraphrase a million times over. It took a story that could have been short and enjoyable and made it into a chore to read.

    I like the principle you’re going with here though. It’s why I enjoy USA Today’s website. It’s clean, clear, and the stories get to the point without unnecessary fluff.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  108. Such a wonderful reference point. Half of us want to write like him and half of us do NOT want to write like him… But he has always been a reference point for me. Well crafted points. Thanks.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  109. Reblogged this on Resort & Luxury Real Estate, Co. and commented:
    Well written & worth the follow!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  110. I really enjoyed this article. As a newly minted copywriter, it seems I have a lot to learn! I remember being taught how to write creatively in year five… my teacher obviously hadn’t read Hemingway.
    Abby
    http://www.pomsawaydownunder.wordpress.com

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  111. This is quite interesting, and right on time for me! I have not gotten to Hemingway (yet) but you’re article has given me new found confidence! It’s ok to not sound like a pretentious twat while writing. Thank you!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  112. Great article. I’m finally accepting (to much chagrin) that shorter is better on the internet. I’m naturally quite verbose and wordy so altering my sentence structure is difficult, but clean and short is clearly a lot better for the internet. Hopefully I can better apply it to my own work. Thanks for this post!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  113. I’m big on brevity so couldn’t agree with you more. This is really good advice, though, and makes me think I need to go chop up my most recent post into more paragraphs. Thanks!

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  114. As an avid copy blogger reader I couldn’t agree with you, or Hemingway (sic) more. I would add the use of images, but I guess Hemingway didn’t draw very well.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  115. I totally agree with you & Hemmingway, a microblog can deliver the message much better than a long blog which most people don’t bother to read entirely.

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  116. paulscribbles #

    Reblogged this on paul scribbles and commented:
    My first re blog…but it is Hemmingway…sort of////

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  117. Thank you for this great article! I enjoyed the repetitiveness of the word “short.” One cannot ever go wrong with writing something not-so-pithy online. xx

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  118. this was very informative

    Like

    April 8, 2013
  119. Thanks for sharing. Suits me fine as I put off writing in my blog at times as I find it a chore to try fluff things out. Now I can relax more into writing 🙂

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  120. Hemingway still can teach us so much. If he had been a 21st-century blogger, no doubt he would have written excellent blogs.
    –JW

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  121. Wonderful advise! And a great read. Thank you for helping us all to become better writers.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  122. I am certain that, had Hemingway been around today, he’d have blogged. Brillianty. But then, that’s Hemingway. To me his writing was pure ‘art deco’ – that is, he stripped it back to the essence in ways that the ‘art nouveau’ generation did not. And in so doing he both joined and helped set the pattern for new styles of writing – ironically, given that nobody ever predicted it, well suited for the way social media and the blog-o-sphere has emerged today. An unwitting prescience, perhaps, that underscores Hemingway’s genius.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  123. Reblogged this on H.R.M. Stoker and commented:
    This is what I try to remember as a blogger.
    – Jada M.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  124. Great tips. I will most certainly be adopting them for my fledgling blogging career. Thanks a lot!

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  125. ah, but I fall in to the trap of Falknoresque thought… I am a perpetrator of run on sentences and overuse of larger words. Great post. If I every want to be be taken seriously as a writer, I should heed this kind of advice!

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  126. I agree with you. A lot of the things you’ve mentioned I wouldn’t have even thought of being important until I read this; Thank you.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  127. Reblogged this on Ruby On Rails Blog and commented:
    Some tips for writing content for a website.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  128. Thank you for the reminders!

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  129. Reblogged this on desiderata:your live is your own..

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  130. In my class we had to start a blog as an assignment. I’ve been looking for ways on how to “up the ante” of my blog and feel these tips will help a lot. I’m not sure how to reach out to readers (since I’m new at all of this) but when the reading is boring, nobody wins. Thanks for the tips!

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  131. dynamisimpact #

    That was a good read, and it only took about five short paragraphs to make the point. Thank you sir.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  132. I have always agreed with Hemingway on this. I could never get through a page of Faulkner. Thanks for sharing. It’s good advice.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  133. d3mola #

    If I was to apply this to what I choose to read I guess that would be bye-bye Homer or Dickens. I once picked up a Jo Nesbo and it was all a sea of white space with words to pad out the novel to several hundred pages. Urgh.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  134. Great post!

    I find it difficult to read so many of the blogs on the internet.

    They write a lot of big words, but they say so little. It makes me wonder if they have ever struggled over one sentence. And I know they do not struggle over entire paragraphs.

    IMHO.

    Thank you again, I will need to blog about this as well.

    Ghost.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  135. Reblogged this on thewordpressghost and commented:
    Friends,

    Hemingway can teach us all how to be better writers.

    Especially on the web, we should be short and to the point. Not long winded and boring. But, refreshing and inspirational.

    Don’t you agree?

    Ghost.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  136. Interesting 😉

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  137. Excellent advice. Look forward to following your blog.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  138. Great advice, and I will do my best to take it.

    Like

    April 9, 2013
  139. 10 words: I enjoy Hemingway and Faulkner, but hate screen-time. Hemingway wins.

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  140. Hemingway’s a hero of mine. Thanks for the article.

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  141. “A Farewell to Arms” is my favorite..!

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  142. Great post right there! Visit my blog anytime if you want!

    Best,
    Hart

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  143. A fantastic post! Contrast this to a comment made by a young lit agent from a well known agency at a writers conference I recently attended. “Oh…Hemingway. He couldn’t get published today. His stuff is to simplex…not cool.” So much for our current “gate keepers.”

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  144. An excellent piece. Brevity is everything. If you can put in one clearly-stated line what others might make a paragraph of (Truman Capote is the master of this shrink-wrapping), then you keep your reader’s attention. I am, however, blogging a book – a literary work – and therefore not trying to make it snappy for snappy’s sake.

    It’s called ‘My Unplanned Obsolescence’ and I’m up to Chapter Nine online: http://thomtopham.wordpress.com/about

    My favourite short-and-to-the-point Hemingway quote is: “Write drunk. Edit sober.”

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  145. Great post! I’m fond of using Hemingway quotes as a basis for my own take on what he said… ie, “Write drunk, edit sober” or, ” Writing is easy, just sit at the typewriter and bleed…”

    Those are two that I’ve used and am also fond of occasionally using. The man had so much going for him… some fellow! 😉

    Like

    April 10, 2013
    • Love that “write drunk, edit sober” quote. One of my favorites.

      Like

      April 16, 2013
  146. Love your post, and I love Hemingway!

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  147. Couldn’t agree more!

    Like

    April 10, 2013
  148. asharlhey #

    Thanks! I found this to be very informative.

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  149. As a new blogger and perhaps aspiring writer, this is really helpful,. Thanks for the pointers!

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  150. Excellent tips, thank you.

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  151. My husband has a degree in Technical Writing so it’s no surprise he is a huge fan of Hemingway. He’s shown me how often there is redundancy in writing, better to get to the point in order to engage your readers. Thanks for the reminder that Hemingway was a revolutionary and is still relevant.

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  152. Great article and an excellent reminder.

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  153. Thanks for the tips!

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  154. I loved your post. I’m a big fan of Hemingway so that pulled me in directly but you did his style justice and adapted it for blogging. In short, keep things short. That’s the way Hemingway would do it.

    Kurt Vonnegut appreciates this advice too. He always writes with very short, 2-3 pages chapters. He had a quote somewhere along the lines of, “hold a stranger’s time in high value. Give them something worth reading.” (That’s not the quote but you get the idea.)

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  155. Great tips! Thanks for sharing! 🙂

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  156. Thanks so much. I can ALWAYS use these tips and know that I have been guilty of some long winded blogs….just a few though 🙂 Thanks again. Very helpful.

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  157. When I read The Sun Also Rises in high school, I really wasn’t a fan of Hemingway at all. The style seemed so choppy and almost like unfinished thoughts. I do agree with you that web writing should be clean and simple though. The reader has so many things competing for their attention on the web that you have to make it as easy as possible to read on the Internet. Thanks for the post!

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  158. Very insightful. Great words of wisdom from a great man.

    Like

    April 11, 2013
  159. Reblogged this on My Notebooks Revealed.

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  160. awesome project, so glad I found it! I launched a 1 minute reading project on my blog, love “do you really think big emotions come from big words??” great.

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  161. Timely reminder that writing does not have to be an arduous and complicated exercise. Excellent suggestions.

    TSD

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  162. awesome post..loved it..thanks for sharing

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  163. Reblogged this on LucyJHamilton and commented:
    I need to re-read my Hemingway ….

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  164. Reblogged this on Writing On Walls: The Enigma of My Mind and commented:
    Good Stuff. Couple personal discrepancies and disagreements but still cool.

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  165. Reblogged this on Giuseppe Savaia.

    Like

    April 12, 2013
  166. Reblogged this on My Miscellania.

    Like

    April 14, 2013
  167. Hemingway is easier to read and understand. Faulkner taxes my brain and i have to try very hard to read one of his books to the end………….

    Like

    April 14, 2013
  168. Really loved your article because of its integrity. Some blogs feel like torture really and this should be a good guideline for many. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Like

    April 14, 2013
  169. I believe your “voice” is more important than any short or long text, it lends to your unique quality content. The way you string your words together more than the correct grammar, Each and every writer has a unique individual voice, and to imitate one or two famous writer takes this individuality away.

    Like

    April 14, 2013
  170. timforkster #

    Yeah mate, great article and very well put. Ernest Hemingway certainly knew what he was doing when writing and he always kept the reader en tuned and in mind. He truly cared that they cared about being informed in the most comfortable and simplest ways he could provide them with. A true writer he was!

    Like

    April 14, 2013
  171. What a great post 🙂 I must admit I am one of those, who get carried away with run-on sentences and the thesaurus way too often! But I will definitely keep this post in mind for next time 🙂

    Like

    April 15, 2013
  172. I really like your post! I am taking a course named Online Tactics and I am learning about web writing. Strongly agree with using short sentence and short paragraphs. Large blocks of text can look like walls, and act as such to the user. People rarely read Web pages word by word; instead, they scan the page, picking out individual words and sentences. Eye-tracking studies, which examine where people’s eyes roam on a webpage, reveal these basic truths about site visitors. They scan to see whether the content is relevant. They are more likely to scan the top of the page than the bottom. They look at headings, boldfaced terms, and images.
    Scanning requires less brainpower than reading. Concise sentences that convey their point quickly are more likely to grab visitors than long, complex sentences and are more likely to entice people to explore further. As an international student, I prefer short sentences than long ones. Anyway, your post helps a lot! Thanks for sharing!

    Like

    April 15, 2013
  173. Wonderful post. Hemingway is one of the writers I look up to and his way of writing is exceptional.
    I loved how you’ve combined his wisdom with your point of view and the modern world. Great job.

    Like

    April 15, 2013
  174. Reblogged this on Permanently Grumpy (A Weblog) and commented:
    Wow.

    Like

    April 15, 2013
  175. Reblogged this on Geekcillin and commented:
    From the Master….

    Like

    April 16, 2013
  176. Reblogged this on kentuckycountrygirl and commented:
    Interesting read…

    Like

    April 16, 2013
  177. Very useful advice, if perhaps not universally applicable. Just what I needed to read today.

    Like

    April 18, 2013
  178. Reblogged this on birowriting and commented:
    I am inspired to take Robert’s advice and re-read Hemingway and Faulkner. We can learn a lot from the greats. After all, their work has survived the test of time.

    Like

    April 18, 2013
  179. madisonbarras #

    Took the words right outta my brain. Check out my about page – “recovering Hemingway addict”.

    Great piece. Thanks!

    Like

    April 20, 2013
  180. Great article, I have been searching for some enlightenments for my writings, and this is a perfect guidance.

    Like

    April 20, 2013
  181. Robert James Nielsen #

    These are all suggestions that are so elegant in their simplicity, yet are so often overlooked (I include myself here from time to time). Thank you for the reminder!

    Like

    April 20, 2013
  182. Reblogged this on shawnwheelerbooks and commented:
    Love, love, love Hemingway…one of my all-time favs!!

    Like

    April 23, 2013
  183. I’ve read books with vocabulary that has blown me away. The words are new and pretty and awesome, but they give me a long list of words to look up. And as I’ll never use them in a conversation, I quickly forget what they mean.

    I’ve often compared them to my writing, sometimes fearing that my vocabulary is mediocre and I need to hoarde and know these more expansive words. Yet my conclusion is that my words are normal, and I want people just to read and not have to stop and run to a reference book every paragraph or so.

    Eloquent simplicity never outdates, it appears.

    Great article- I needed it!

    Like

    April 23, 2013
  184. Great blog. I agree; keep it simple and to the point.

    Like

    April 24, 2013
  185. Love the post. It made some simple but often overlooked points. Thanks.

    Like

    April 25, 2013
  186. yogatravels1 #

    Once again floating to the top – SIMPLE. Can we keep it simple please.

    Like

    April 27, 2013
  187. I actually found your post very educational and interesting. Thank you.

    Like

    April 28, 2013
  188. These tips — whether they be from Hemingway, or yourself — are very practical and I thank you for bringing them to my attention. In the world of blogs and www, there is a sense of ADD and it’s something that must be catered to.

    Like

    May 2, 2013
  189. Reblogged this on Karuna's Treasure Blog and commented:
    Here are some good tips about web writing, it helped me!

    Like

    May 6, 2013
  190. softcottonbeauty #

    Thanks for the great post : )

    Like

    May 7, 2013
  191. Superb content.

    Like

    May 8, 2013
  192. your attempted comparison between yourself and hemmingway is naive and oversimplified. and by that i don’t mean the words or sentences. i am referring to the lack of thought behind them.

    Like

    May 25, 2013
  193. As someone who is just starting a new blog, this post makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the sound advice.

    Like

    June 15, 2013
  194. Hemingway once said he wrote his first draft for himself gave little to the reader. Then on each rewrite, he wrote less for himself and more for the reader, until it was all for the reader and nothing left for himself. In other words, write for the reader.

    “The Flight of Refugees” is a good example of Hemingway’s approach to style and thrifty prose. The emotion comes from the creative combination of simple words.
    http://herrspeightsventures.com/The_Flight_of_Refugees.html

    Like

    July 23, 2013
  195. As a new blogger, this is great information! Thanks so much!

    Like

    July 31, 2013
  196. Would add one: Hemingway used mostly anglo-saxon words with an occasional latinized one thrown in for a little spice.

    Like

    October 14, 2013
  197. Reblogged this on The 50-something life of a Southern gal.

    Like

    December 25, 2013
  198. Reblogged this on Where the Mind Roams and commented:
    Good advice.

    Like

    December 26, 2013
  199. Does your website have a contact page? I’m having problems locating it
    but, I’d like to shoot you an email. I’ve got
    some suggestions for your blog you might be interested in hearing.
    Either way, great site and I look forward to seeing it grow over
    time.

    Like

    May 23, 2014

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | pulitzerschmulitzer
  2. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | Bluxome Street Post
  3. 2012 Annual Report | The Road
  4. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | paulhunterjones
  5. Ezra's Blog
  6. Writing for the ADD Web User | gretchenmiron
  7. G is for Great Gobs of Gramma’s Grammar Goodies and Goofs | JaniceHeck
  8. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | Blog of a Constant Reader
  9. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | Mandy Suess
  10. “He was the Lady Gaga of his era.” | 101 Books
  11. Can You Ever Master the Writing Craft? | the writer's refuge
  12. The Job Search – Ariel + Grace
  13. “What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing” by Robert Bruce | En el Jardín de los Elefantes
  14. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | sureshkumarsmail
  15. MONDAY CREATIVE WRITING EXERCISE BECAUSE IT’S A GOOD WAY TO START THE WEEKlong and short sentences | BRIDGET WHELAN writer
  16. Book #55: The Sun Also Rises | 101 Books
  17. 4 Stupid, Mistakes I Made as a Writer in my Real Estate Blog
  18. What Astronauts Can Teach You About Writing Dialogue | 101 Books
  19. Ann Patchett’s 7 Writing Tips | 101 Books
  20. The Top 10 Posts From 2013 | 101 Books
  21. Redacción para web: cómo escribir para Internet | Pablo Tassani
  22. Fall Break Is In Effect | 101 Books
  23. What Hemingway Can Teach You About Web Writing | Bluxome Street Post

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: