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The Gravestones of 8 Famous Authors

It’s Halloween in the U.S., so what better way to creep everyone out than a bunch of photos of gravestones.

Using Find A Grave, I looked up a bunch of prominent authors. Not all of their pages had photos—like David Foster Wallace, JD Salinger, Richard Heller, Kurt Vonnegut—but many of them did.

I’m not sure why, but I’ve always had a weird fascination with cemetaries, so I find these photos more fascinating than creepy. But see what you think.

William Faulkner’s grave in Oxford, Mississippi. Not surprising that Faulkner’s grave is so well kept. He’s worshiped over there.

William Golding’s grave in Wiltshire, England. The Lord of the Flies author is buried under an old yew tree in Holy Trinity Churchyard. Looks like a scenic spot, fitting of an author whose most famous novel was set on a scenic island.

Ernest Hemingway’s grave in Ketchum, Idaho. I’ve been to Idaho several times and I always wanted to see Hemingway’s grave, but never made it there.

Malcolm Lowry’s grave in East Sussex, England. You have to strain your eyes to even see Lowry’s name on the headstone. Kind of sad. His grave is obviously not maintained well.

Margaret Mitchell’s grave in the famous Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta. Beautiful gravestone. Compare it to the grave of Lowry, who died eight years after Mitchell. She’s buried next to her husband, John Robert Marsh.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s grave in Oxfordshire, England. Do you think hobbits secretly maintain it?

Mark Twain’s grave in Elmira, New York. Good ole’ Samuel Clemons’ gravestone could use a catchy Twain quote couldn’t it?

Virginia Woolf’s grave in Sussex, England. Woolf’s ashes are buried under an elm tree in the garden of Monk’s House in Sussex, according to the Find A Grave site. I’ve got to say, the head statue creeps me out.

So if you’re in the Halloween mood, swing on over to Find A Grave and look for your favorite famous person’s grave or even a family member.

If you find an author’s grave you’d like to share with us, do so in the comments!

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18 Comments Post a comment
  1. Eric Blair’s (George Orwell) grave is in Sutton Courtney, Oxfordshire. It’s not particularly easy to find either. Unfortunately I don’t have a photo at hand.

    Like

    October 31, 2012
  2. I agree with you, Woolf’s head statue is creepy! Some of the best times I’ve had on trips were in grave yards. There are a few in Paris which have just as much art as many of the museums! And seeing Chaucer’s grave inside Westminster Abbey was amazing – and the Highgate Cemeteries too. Maybe I’m just morbid.

    Like

    October 31, 2012
    • Chaucer…wow, that would be amazing.

      Like

      October 31, 2012
      • Yeah – it was surreal. And it did take me forever to find it because I kept getting distracted and wouldn’t ask for help 😀

        Like

        October 31, 2012
  3. Thanks!

    Like

    October 31, 2012
  4. NCL #

    It’s funny, I’ve always wanted to start some sort of fund to replace Lowry’s stone. It wouldn’t require much money at all for a simples tone and epitaph. Unfortunately, I’ve talked to several people in the know about this in England, and they say his brother isn’t interested n any of that. His brother must be so old at this point though. Maybe in the future, there won’t be any aversion to replacing the stone. I think it would be nice gesture..

    Like

    October 31, 2012
    • That sounds like something you could crowd source through Facebook or Twitter. Just create a group to replace Malcolm Lowry’s gravestone and see if you could raise the money.

      Like

      October 31, 2012
      • NCL #

        I know it would be easy to raise funds, but I live in Canada, and even beginning to approach the legal ramifications of replacing a grave market in another country makes me pause.

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        October 31, 2012
  5. This is so special and it is beautiful to remember people.Thank you Robert.

    Like

    October 31, 2012
  6. I once visited Jane Austen’s stone in the country church where she resides below. A few years ago Emma Thompson talked about visiting her grave to discuss writing issues and revenue numbers and it was perfectly fitting.

    Like

    October 31, 2012
  7. If you ever want to see a whole bunch of dead famous people together in one place, I highly recommend Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris. Oh, and also the Pantheon. Paris loves dead famous people, I GUESS.

    I’ve always wanted to see Sylvia Plath’s grave (naturally).

    Like

    October 31, 2012
  8. How did I not know that Twain’s grave is in Elmira? What a lame fan I am. I lived within relatively easy driving distance from there for 22 years and never checked it out. Sheesh. I’ll have to rectify that the next time I go home to visit my folks.

    Like

    November 1, 2012
    • Wow. Yeah, you got to do that. Probably would make a great post on your blog, too.

      Like

      November 1, 2012
    • I had no idea, either. I live about an hour or so from Elmira…

      Like

      November 8, 2012
  9. The bust on Virginia Woolf’s grave is a copy of one that’s now in the National Portrait Gallery in London. I want to say it was Lucien Freud’s work, but not 100% on that.

    Like

    November 3, 2012
  10. Reblogged this on universoart.

    Like

    December 2, 2012

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