Skip to content
Advertisements

Help Me Pick The Next Five Novels

So I’m wrapping up Wide Sargasso Sea. And, after that, I’ll be reading Things Fall Apart, which will be book #43.

But that’s all I have planned at the moment. So I need some help selecting the next five novels I’ll be reading from the Time list. And that’s where you come in.

I’ve selected two of the next five novels–An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser and The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder–but I was hoping you guys could vote on the other three.

What do you say?

Just a few qualifiers. I’m reserving three books for later: Ulysses, The Great Gatsby, and The Lord of the Rings. So don’t vote for any of those three books.

Also, since An American Tragedy is nearly 1,000 pages, no other bulky books this time around, which will exclude Gravity’s Rainbow, The Recognitions, and The Sot-Weed Factor.

Other than that, fire away!

Go look at the list and find three novels I haven’t read yet. The three novels that get the most votes will join An American Tragedy and The Bridge of San Luis Rey as my next five reads.

You can vote for one, or you can vote for all three, but don’t vote for more than three books. Get all your votes in before Sunday, as I’ll be posting on the next 5 on Monday.

Again, check out the list and come back here to place your vote!  So what’s it going to be?

Advertisements
44 Comments Post a comment
  1. Dominick Sabalos #

    Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh
    Lucky Jim – Kingsley Amis
    Snow Crash – Neal Stephenson

    Like

    May 18, 2012
    • I’ve heard “Brideshead” is pretty awesome.

      Like

      May 18, 2012
  2. Matt #

    Pale Fire, The Crying of Lot 49, and All the King’s Men

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  3. The Berlin Stories, Money, and Naked Lunch. I only pick the last one b/c I really want to see you read that book in front of everyone on your lunch break!

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  4. Light in August is Faulkner’s most approachable novel, in my opinion. Don’t let previous bad experiences with Faulkner (I’m assuming, most people have them) keep you away.

    I love A Death in the Family. That’s a very disturbing sentence. But yes, a beautiful book, and a quick, quick read, too, which it sounds like will be appreciated.

    And Their Eyes Were Watching God. I love this book.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  5. Ubik —
    Heart of the Matter — Greene
    Grapes of Wrath — Steinbeck

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  6. J. #

    Atonement, Invisible Man, Money

    Like

    May 18, 2012
    • Love Invisible Man! That will be a re-read.

      Like

      May 18, 2012
      • J. #

        Most definitely. I would say it needs about three reads. It’s long and dense, but not like anything I’d read or have read since.

        Like

        May 18, 2012
  7. Atonement
    Invisible Man
    The Heart of the Matter

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  8. Scott Chaney #

    Anything with Fabio on the cover.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
    • Are you recommending one of your own books?

      Like

      May 18, 2012
  9. Allen #

    Naked Lunch.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  10. Really tough to limit to 3! There are quite a few good books left to go. My own picks are The Golden Notebook, On the Road, and The Day of the Locust. I have to admit I didn’t really care much for The Day of the Locust when I read it, but I have been unable to forget it. It’s not that it was a bad book, but seemed at first to be rather superficial. However, as I thought about the book, it impressed me more and more with it’s satire of American life in what is probably a rather atypical environment–that of Hollywood. But since Hollywood has had (and still has) such a strong affect on our culture, I find it a valuable read and an important work for understanding our roots as Americans. On the Road again depicts a rather atypical bunch of young men as they weave their way across the country, but I think Kerouac has captured in this novel some of the driving, and almost insane impatience which characterizes much of American society. Of these three, The Golden Notebook is perhaps my favorite read. It’s over-long, and perhaps a little disjointed in spots. But it is a very penetrating analysis of the individuality so strong in American life (even though it takes place in England), and the problems this individuality causes us. Lessing attempts to answer the question of how we define ourselves as unique individuals, and how nebulous that concept can become. Her main character is pulled hither and yon as she encounters various other characters, each of whom has a strong affect on her sense of self. Her introduction to the book alone is well worth spending some time with.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
    • Definitely a Kerouac fan. When I get to it, OTR will be a re-read. Read it about 10 years ago and loved it.

      Like

      May 18, 2012
  11. My vote for number 1 goes to Atonement by Ian McEwan. I find some of McEwan’s other books quite difficult to ‘get into’ and he has a tendency to write dark books. But Atonement is one of my favorite novels. McEwan’s style of writing is very descriptive and detailed. I hope Atonement gets picked as I’d enjoy reading your thoughts on it.

    2: On the Road by Jack Kerouac. This is so clearly a product of the ’60s that I found myself smiling at many points in the book, even though it’s not meant to be a comedy. It has some off-the-wall parts and chapters which a friend described to me as ‘sounding like they were written at 3 or 4 am in the morning when Kerouac was probably under the influence of something!’

    3: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  12. Siuon #

    Atonement – Ian McEwan

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  13. On the Road, The Grapes of Wrath, Light in August

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  14. sylviemarieheroux #

    Hi Robert,
    1. Definitely Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children, loads of fun, will love to hear what you think of it (you gotta love the absurd)
    2. Doris Lessing’s Golden Notebook: I read that one in college, oh so many years ago, and it totally turned me on to Doris Lessing
    3. V.S. Naipaul’s A House for Mr. Biswas: Heard so much about it when my husband was reading it… want another opinion

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  15. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie
    All the Kings Men

    I’ve read both of those and thought them both good and interesting

    Brideshead Revisited

    Never read it, but am interested to know more about it

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  16. The Sun Also Rises … sweet, and a nice addition to the other works you are reading

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  17. All the King’s Men, Ragtime, and Atonement

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  18. Possession, A Passage to India, and Tropic of Cancer.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  19. How about three very different novelspuclished (almost) in the same year? The Day of the Locust, The Grapes of Wrath and The Man who Loved Children. All excellent, in my opinion, for very different reasons.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  20. Brideshead Revisited, To the Lighthouse (because of your love for Virginia) and White Teeth.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
    • You’re so kind to vote for a Virginia Woolf book.

      Like

      May 18, 2012
      • Haahaa – rumor has it, and by that I mean Susan Hill said, that it’s her best work.

        Like

        May 18, 2012
  21. turnerbethany #

    My votes: Invisible Man, Ragtime, and A Passage to India.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  22. A Death in the Family – James Agee (just finished, and it is superb – beautifully written)
    Their Eyes Were Watching God – Zora Neale Hurston (superb, sticks with you for a while)
    On the Road – Jack Kerouac (surprising, didn’t think I’d like it, but his mastery of the language is incredible, and I ended up loving it)

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  23. My picks are Naked Lunch, The Pride of Miss Jean Brodie and White Teeth.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  24. Jillian ♣ #

    Atonement, Invisible Man & Possession 🙂

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  25. My three votes go to:

    The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck
    Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison
    Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  26. Atonement, The Sun Also Rises and Red Harvest.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  27. Rachel Etta #

    Atonement and Possession, because I’d love to read these along.
    And The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, because it’s a lovely short read.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  28. The Dreiser book sounds harrowing. You may need a break, so I vote for The Sun Also Rises, A Passage to India and Money (– not my favorite book, but it is a fast read and I think the topic is similar to An American Tragedy so it might make for interesting blogs.) I’ll read Dreiser with you.

    Like

    May 18, 2012
  29. Atonement
    Brideshead Revisited
    The Grapes of Wrath

    Like

    May 19, 2012
  30. Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, Blood Meridian, Gone with the Wind, these quite wonderful ~and anything by C.S. Lewis~ Good luck! Deborah

    Like

    May 19, 2012
  31. “Money” is one of my FAVORITE books EVER. Martin Amis will have you laughing out loud. You seem to need some levity!

    Like

    May 20, 2012
  32. Sam Philliber #

    Their Eyes were watching God and Things Fall Apart. I have to read those for AP Lit this summer.

    Like

    May 20, 2012
  33. Of those left Grapes of Wrath is my favourite.
    I’ll follow whatever u pick tho…
    Thanks A.K.

    Like

    May 20, 2012
  34. I’m voting for:

    Atonement (I think this is one of the front-runners)
    Housekeeping (I am surprised no one voted for this)
    Play It As It Lays (and this, too)

    Like

    May 20, 2012
  35. Money
    Atonement
    Crying of Lot 49

    Like

    May 20, 2012

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: