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3 Petit Fours That Look Delicious

When I heard Lolita was about a petit four (pronounced “pet-a-fore”), I got really excited, as I loved baked goods.

Nothing is more awesome than going to a party and finding a table full of smallish chocolate filled pastries with confectioners sugar. Who doesn’t love a nice petit four with a steaming cup of hot chocolate?

And who would’ve thought a novel about a petit four (pronounced “pet-a-fore”) would be one of the most highly regarded, classic novels of the 20th century? How creative is Nabokov guy?

So in honor of Lolita, I present to you three petit fours (pronounced “pet-a-fore”) that look delicious.

1) Now look at that one. Wow, what a beautiful group of petit fours. Look, it’s a Christmas theme! How lovely!

Image: Tobyotter/Flickr

2) Shut your mouth! This is like a petit four party tray only found in some type of petit four promise land. What I love about these petit fours is the mirrored tray. Thanks to the tray, you get to bask in the beauty of your reflection as you eat this decadent, chocolatey goodness, so it’s almost like eating the petit four twice.

Image: Le Blagueur A Paris/Flickr

3) So the photo description on Flickr says this is a “super cute lemon mousse blackberry petit four.” I don’t know about “super cute” part, unless that’s a culinary term that is on par with “I would eat 15 of these and not feel one bit bad about it–at least emotionally.” How are those lines so straight? If petit fours ever establish their own kingdom, I suggest that this photographed petit four become the Petit Four Prince.

Image:allliecooper/Flickr

Hold up. Wait a minute. Oh, no…I’m so embarrassed.

I just realized Lolita is about a pedophile, not a petit four. Well, that’s just disgusting now isn’t it?

This saddens me. I have to read a book about a pedophile? Seriously?

I’d much rather the book be about some type of petit four drama—maybe a group of competitive petit fours fight it out to be eaten at the Royal Wedding.

But, instead, Lolita is about some old pervert. Note to Vladamir Nabokov: Baked goods would’ve been much more interesting—and a lot less nauseating.

I’ll somehow manage my disappointment and preview Lolita tomorrow.

(Feature Image: Wikimedia Commons)

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32 Comments Post a comment
  1. Aaah, by the time you finish you will realise that pedophile stories may be as enjoyable, if not more so, than petit fours.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
  2. And, more worryingly, by the time you finish you’ll find that you may have felt sympathetic towards a paedophile too!

    Like

    December 13, 2011
    • That is worrying. I’m a fairly sympathetic guy, but that might even be a stretch for me. I’m trying to approach the book without a lot of preconceived notions, but that’s proving difficult.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
      • Abandon all thoughts of paedophilia, and your preconceived notions of what a paedophile is, and let Navokov work his magic through the characters and his writing. Let the story stand alone. It’s amazing for someone whose first language isn’t English (as I think someone else has said).

        Like

        December 14, 2011
  3. Triple dog dare – go to Starbucks with your Margaret book and Lolita. Read one and set the other on the table. Super cool.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
    • Oh my. Can you imagine the stares? I’d probably get put on some type of watch list before I could even leave the Starbucks.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
  4. If ever there was a case to be made for book burning, it’s this piece of trash. I read about 18 pages before I threw this so called classic into the garbage. I can’t believe that it appears in many summer reading lists…like Barnes & Noble.

    And how does anyone even have the thoughts that Nabokov put down on paper?

    Like

    December 13, 2011
    • That last question is an honest one that I want to investigate more while reading this book.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
    • For real? A reader that actually advocates book burning? Greg, I really don’t think that Nabokov was advocating for pedophilia. I could be wrong; I don’t know much about Nabokov. But I think that the book allows us to explore how our thoughts and attitudes shift when we’re exposed to different circumstances. It’s been a long time since I read it (I read it in high school, supervised by a teacher for our advanced lit class) but what I remember about that experience was the numerous discussions we had about human behavior, the psychology of sex and sexual abuse, and victim vs. villain psychology. It was immensely interesting and informative. I wouldn’t recommend it as leisure reading, but I don’t consider it trash, either. I would argue that subject matter doesn’t determine a piece’s worth or relevance; how the subject is dealt with is what makes that distinction.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
      • Quite simply, the mere thought of pedophilia is far outside the lines of a world I want to be in. Maybe it’s that I have two daughters. Maybe it’s that I knew a guy who turned out to be a pedophile. The whole concept is revolting.

        As for a discussion of human behavior, I disagree. The rape of the innocent is in-human, savage.

        As a lover of books and the freedom they bring to the world, I don’t advocate “burning books”. I did not intend my comment to be interpreted that way. However, I do not think Lolita is worthy of more than a toss into the trash can.

        Like

        December 13, 2011
  5. Teresa #

    I agree. It should not be on the recommended book lists.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
  6. I loved reading Lolita because Nabokov is a masterful writer who challenges you to not accept the narrator’s point of view as accurate or truthful. While getting inside Humbert’s mind, you see how he takes advantage of Lolita while trying to convince himself that she was willing. Meanwhile, Lolita isn’t even given the agency of telling her own story, but manages to rebel against him. Pay careful attention to the writing itself, as it is beautiful.

    One thing that I will say, however, is that Pale Fire is a far superior book and that Nabokov is famous for the wrong story.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
    • I’ve heard Lolita is the classic unreliable narrator story. That does make it a little more intriguing.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
    • Grace, I completely agree about Pale Fire.

      For me, Lolita is about enchantment (and is itself an enchantment). It’s so true, so illusory, all things at once, it’s got so much feeling to offer it makes you almost too alive!

      Robert, please do not abandon it after reading 18 pages. Not that you would be able to do it, what with all the public pressure, of which this post is a great example.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
    • Oh dear. I so wanted to love Pale Fire. I’ve tried and tried and tried to get through it, but ultimately wound up sitting on the shelf abandoned. Help me understand what’s amazing about Pale Fire?

      Like

      December 13, 2011
      • It’s another classic unreliable narrator story, but the form is completely different than anything I’ve read before. It begins with a poem about the poet’s daughter’s death, but the story is found in the commentary, which is written by a narcissistic deposed Eastern European leader who believes that the poem is really about himself. Oh, and the wordplay with characters/places that sound Russian is fantastic.

        Like

        December 14, 2011
      • I read the poem and I get the unreliable narrator bit (I made it over 1/2 way through it before I abandoned it) but it just fell flat for me. It’s been a couple years now, maybe I should give it another try.

        Like

        December 15, 2011
  7. I don’t know if you saw, but I grabbed a bunch of books from your lists because I really want to reach my goal of 60 this year and I’m kinda far. ANYWAYS, I finished Revolutionary Road on Saturday. And I started Rabbit, Run on Sunday. But I have Lolita at home too so I think I’ll read that next and coincide with you.

    BTW Revolutionary Road… really?? Frank Wheeler is a $@%@*ing piece of $@)%&* bag of $%#%(& and April? Well she’s just plain trapped and desperate. What a crazy story. Painful.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
    • Rabbit, Run…DEPRESSING, but so good. There’s one scene that still might be the most brutal scene I’ve read of all the books.

      Glad to hear you’re following along! I think I responded to your comment on the Rev. Road review, but can’t remember for sure.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
      • Oh lord, I hadn’t realized THIS is the book with the brutal scene. He’s a screwed up character. BLEGH.

        Like

        December 14, 2011
  8. Gayle #

    I loved “Lolita” primarily for Humbert’s humor. After hearing Jeremy Irons read it on tape, he makes him sound a bit more sinister in a way that only Jeremy Irons can do.

    The writing is beautiful, just don’t EVER see the movie.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
    • Definitely don’t intend on doing that.

      Like

      December 13, 2011
  9. Carly #

    I read Lolita in high school, not knowing what I was getting myself into.

    What amazed me about the book was Nabokov’s mastery of the English language. I’m not normally someone who can appreciate particularly good writing but I remember stopping several times and marvelling at the brilliance of a few of the sentences he created. The story itself is secondary to the writing.

    The fact that English wasn’t his first language just adds to the genius.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
  10. Lolita is one of my favorite books ever. Nabokov made magic happen with this book.

    Like

    December 13, 2011
  11. Pedophile is indeed a disgusting subject to be read, but there is an overarching theme. Try hazarding a guess. And after I finished the book, the description at the back of my copy (the 50th anniversary edition), which goes something like “the only convincing love story ever told,” is justified.

    Like

    December 14, 2011
  12. I had the same concerns when I first read “Lolita”, but Nabokov is masterful and there is more than meets the eye here. Nabokov himself opposed the claims that his novel was obscene. He does not intend to portray pedophilia in a positive light at all, and this is one novel that will let you into a troubled criminal’s mind — no sugarcoating or attempts to make him look at least noble/justify his actions through his “tortured” soul, which is something a lot of outlaw books often try to do. Great book.

    Like

    December 15, 2011
  13. “Petit four” is pronounced something”potee fooor”, I don’t know which you had the “pet-a-fore” from.

    Like

    September 30, 2016

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. Lolita: Inside The Mind Of A Pedophile | 101 Books
  2. Lolita: Inside The Mind Of A Pedophile | 101 Books
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