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Posts tagged ‘reading’

101 Books Turns 4!

4 years. 918 posts. 20,000 comments. 32,000 subscribers. More than 1.2 million page views.

When I dreamed up this hair-brained idea back on a whim back in August 2010, I never dreamed 101 Books would become what it is today.

I figured it would take 4 to 5 years to finish all 101 novels—now it’s looking like it will take a little longer than that—but I really had no vision for this, and I surely didn’t expect all the numbers I listed above. Read more

You Might Not Be A Writer (And That’s Okay)

I’ve heard a sentiment over the last few years that goes something like this: “Everyone’s a writer. We all just need to tap into our ‘inner writer’ to become one.”

That’s probably a simplistic representation, but the sentiment is along those lines.

It sounds nice. It might make you feel a little warm and fuzzy inside.

But it’s not true. Read more

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Words…But What If You Couldn’t See It?

That question comes from the Tactile Picture Books Project, which is a fascinating, inspiring, and just downright brilliant use of technology.

What is it? Some researchers at the University of Colorado have created 3-D printed storybooks for visually impaired children. Think braille on steroids.

Images literally emerge from the page, formed into shapes of the objects within the book’s text. They allow visually impaired kids to get a better sense of the elements of a story, like landscapes.

Check out these examples from Goodnight Moon, which show the text and the braille, followed by the 3-D printed images:  Read more

Richard Ford Meets Stephen Colbert

Richard Ford appeared on Stephen Colbert’s show a few years ago to promote his novel, Canada.

Colbert, as only he can, talks about how offended he is that the novel isn’t named America.

It’s a pretty humorous exchange between the two about Canada, guns, writing, and being famous. Colbert’s awesome, and Richard Ford does an outstanding job of staying with him the whole time. Read more

What Do You See When You Read?

This Slate article has been making the rounds recently, and it’s something we’ve talked about briefly here on 101 Books before.

That being, how do you imagine the characters in the novels you read?

Do you have a good sense of what they look like? Can you see them clearly in your head? Or is it more of a vague, kinda, sorta image that comes every time you read their name?

If you pick up on specific details the author writes, then you’ll have a decent sense of the character—but do most of us actually formulate images based on what’s written—or just how we want to imagine the character in our heads?

Specifically, for those of you who have read and watched The Lord of the Rings, how do you imagine those characters—and how did you imagine them BEFORE the movies were released? Read more

A New Challenger For Worst Book Cover Ever

We have a new challenger for worst book cover ever.

Yes, I even think it is worse than this delightfully awful book cover.

We won’t even talk about the book’s topic itself–that’s a different discussion.

But let’s just take a look at the beauty that is this book cover. Read more

If It Bleeds, It Leads

“The cheap drama artists of my profession are…specialists at nosing out failure: hinting a fighter’s legs as suspect once he’s over thirty and finally in his prime; reporting a hitter’s wrists are stiff just when he’s learned to go the opposite way and can help the team by advancing runners. They see only the germs of defeat in victory, venality in all human endeavor. Sportswriters are sometimes damned bad men, and create a life of lies and false tragedies.”

- The Sportswriter by Richard Ford

Grantland Rice is perhaps the most famous sportswriter in history. He wrote in the first half of the 20th Century, and he most famously coined the name of Notre Dame’s “Four Horsemen” in 1924.

In fact, he likely penned the most famous lede in sportswriting history. Read more

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