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Posts tagged ‘mrs. dalloway’

10 Things (Possibly) More Boring Than Mrs Dalloway

Today’s post is my guest post that appeared on Book Riot last Friday. As it pertains to my never-ending hate affair with Mrs. Dalloway, which most of you are well aware of by now, I thought I’d share the post here on 101 Books. Enjoy! 

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The other day, in an unprecedented fit of boredom, I stared at a blank wall for 90 seconds. At some point, maybe around the 70-second mark, I thought to myself: This feels a lot like reading Mrs. Dalloway.

The wall, though blank, certainly has a lot going for it. Someone spent a lot of time building it, then they primed it and painted it. They even cared enough about that wall to put a ceiling above it and a floor below it.

That’s a lot like Mrs. Dalloway, too. Because even though it bored me to tears, Virginia Woolf obviously spent a lot of time writing it. She was a smart woman.

But back to the wall. It just stood there, not moving, not changing color—basically just hanging out, like it was at Mrs. Dalloway’s party sipping watered-down punch.

That whole wall experience got me to thinking—what’s more boring: a white wall or Mrs. Dalloway? After many hours of laborious thought, I decided to give the slight edge to Mrs. Dalloway.

Yes, I find Mrs. Dalloway horribly tedious. So much so, that it’s currently ranked 46 out of the first 46 novels I’ve read from Time Magazine’s All-Time 100 novels.

So to better explain my thoughts on this novel, I thought I’d take some time to compare it to 10 other boring things. Let’s see how the following things stack up versus Mrs. Dalloway in the land of tedium:

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Repost: Book #13: Mrs. Dalloway

It’s rerun week at 101 Books! Today’s post originally appeared on March 21, 2011101 Books will return live on Monday July 9. 

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Get your pitchforks ready. Find a stake you can set fire to. Get ready to riot and burn an effigy of me.

Because I’m about to be honest: I didn’t like Mrs. Dalloway. There, I said it. I’ve probably committed some kind of literary heresy by admitting this, but I’ve got to keep it real, as the kids say.

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It’s Not You. It’s Me.

“It’s Not You. It’s Me.”

Have you ever felt that way about a book?

You know, the old clichéd way that the girl always breaks up with the boy, like George got the news broken to him in that one episode of Seinfeld. A short monologue is accompanied by a kiss on the cheek, and off she goes into the sunset.

When it comes to reading, though, have you ever felt like that? You appreciate the book. You think you understand why other people like it. But it’s just not for you.

If so, where do you draw the line? How can you tell if something is genuinely a piece of crap, and the people who like it must be border-line illiterate, or whether it’s just not your proverbial cup of tea?

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Who is the King (or Queen) of the Long Sentence?

I haven’t hidden the fact that I wasn’t a fan of Mrs. Dallowaywhich is currently last in my rankings of the books I’ve read to this pointInterestingly, though, I’ve noticed some similarities between Mrs. Dalloway and Infinite Jest.

Both David Foster Wallace and Virginia Woolf didn’t mind writing a sentence with hundreds of words. I believe a couple of sentences in Infinite Jest last more than a full page.

But the difference being, in my opinion, that David Foster Wallace’s long sentences actually make sense to my small brain.

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Book #13: Mrs. Dalloway

Get your pitchforks ready. Find a stake you can set fire to. Get ready to riot and burn an effigy of me.

Because I’m about to be honest: I didn’t like Mrs. Dalloway. There, I said it. I’ve probably committed some kind of literary heresy by admitting this, but I’ve got to keep it real, as the kids say.

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Next Up: Mrs. Dalloway

On the surface, Mrs. Dalloway is a book that I’m not sure I will enjoy. A story about a day in the life of a woman hosting a party? Lord help me. Unless she’s hosting a Super Bowl party, this one doesn’t really seem up my alley.

I couldn’t have timed this worse. The NCAA tournament starts today, and I’m reading Mrs. Dalloway? Seriously? What was I thinking? Why couldn’t I have gone with Hemingway?

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The Next Five

One of the most fun aspects of this project is investigating which books to read next. Four books slowly trickled in via Amazon this week.  I already own The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.

Now, it’s just a matter of digging in, once I finish, I, Claudius–which is turning out to be a wonderful read. Not sure yet about the order in which I’ll read the next five.

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