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Posts tagged ‘books’

Stannis Baratheon: Protector of Grammar in Westeros

While Stannis Baratheon moves forward in his claim to take the Iron Throne at King’s Landing, he makes sure to correct the grammar of illiterates along the way.

Over the course of nearly 5 seasons on Game of Thrones, Stannis has taken the opportunity to clarify the difference between “less” and “fewer” on two occasions. The brief dialogue happens so quick that you might not notice it.

I almost feel like we’re getting a “wink, wink” from the show’s writers here, and I love it.

Here’s the first clip from Season 2. Read more

Evelyn Waugh Compares Memories To Pigeons

I don’t have a lot for you today coming off of a three-day holiday weekend, but I do want to share this passage from Brideshead Revisited with you.

If you’re scoring at home, it’s on page 259.

Evelyn Waugh compares memories to pigeons and the rest of us are better off for it. Tell me this isn’t an incredibly written paragraph.

I want to go sit on a park bench, feed a pigeon, and reminisce about my childhood in Georgia.

brideshead passage

11 Quirky Truths About Being A Writer

After a decade or so of doing this writing thing, I’ve decided that writers are a unique lot. We’re kind of weird, wouldn’t you agree?

Recently I noticed some of my own quirks and thought I’d write them down.

But, certainly, these can’t just be truths about me, right? Certainly, you guys who write deal with the same stuff, right? I’m not the only one, am I?

You tell me if you’ve noticed the same things: Read more

Memorable Lines From Brideshead Revisited

Brideshead Revisited is one of those novels that’s filled with memorable passages and witty one-liners.

One minute you’ll be reading a reflective passage from Charles Ryder, the narrator. The next you’ll be reading some witty one-liners from his alcoholic socialite friend, Sebastian.

The novel has so many good quotes that I thought I’d pull out a few and share with you guys today. Take a look:

“I should like to bury something precious in every place where I’ve been happy and then, when I’m old and ugly and miserable, I could come back and dig it up and remember.”

“Sometimes, I feel the past and the future pressing so hard on either side that there’s no room for the present at all.”

“The trouble with modern education is you never know how ignorant people are. With anyone over fifty you can be fairly confident what’s been taught and what’s been left out. But these young people have such an intelligent, knowledgeable surface, and then the crust suddenly breaks and you look down into depths of confusion you didn’t know existed.”

“O God, make me good, but not yet.”

“[Change is] the only evidence of life.”

“No one could really hate a saint, could they? They can’t really hate God either. When they want to Hate Him and His saints they have to find something like themselves and pretends it’s God and hate that.”

I’m digging this novel.

I don’t think it’s going to be a top-10er in my rankings, but I believe, by the time I’ve finished reading it, I’ll be happy to recommend Brideshead Revisited.

Very curious to see where this one goes.

James Joyce Was A Copyeditor’s Nightmare

Take a look at this. Holy crap!

I’m not sure if this was a copyeditor having a nightmare with Joyce’s original draft, or if it was Joyce editing a later draft. Either way, let’s all thank God for track changes in Word.

I can’t imagine working like this. Might as well be reading Greek.

joyce

Source: Rupert Thomson via Twitter

Time’s 100 Novels Ranked By Amazon Sales

One of my favorite parts of Amazon is the Amazon sales rank. It’s just a quick gauge of how the public generally receives a book.

While sales don’t always indicate a novel’s quality or critical reception (see Twilight), they’re sometimes a decent indicator. So because I have tons of free time (I don’t, really), I thought I’d dig up the Amazon sales ranking for all of the Time Magazine 100 novels. Then, throw them all in a spreadsheet and see how they rank.

Let’s take a look at how the Time 100 novels rank by sales on Amazon. Note: The book’s overall ranking is the number to the right. Read more

A Look Inside Castle Howard

What exactly is Castle Howard, you ask?

It’s the castle chosen to depict the Brideshead castle in both the mini-series and cinematic versions of Brideshead Revisited. And, as you can see, it’s beautiful.

The castle is located in North Yorkshire, England and has been the actual private residence of the Carlisle branch of the Howard family for more than 300 years.

Construction began in 1699 and took more than 100 years to complete, using the design by Sir John Vanbrugh. The entire estate covers 13,000 acres.  Read more

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