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Posts tagged ‘books’

5 Ways To Generate Blog Post Ideas

This marks my 954th post on 101 Books.

Four years ago, I would’ve laughed if you told me I would publish that many posts on this blog. How could I possibly write 954 posts about a list of books?

But you’d be surprised at how relatively easy it is to come up with topics once you make a habit out of coming up with topics. I’ve figured out a few ways to build brainstorming into my everyday life, without taking up a chunk of time I don’t have.

That’s really helped me generate new ideas for the blog, so I thought I’d share a few of my tips with you guys. If you have a blog, maybe you might find one or two worth your time. Read more

The Praise And Criticism Of William Styron

The Confessions of Nat Turner is just a fascinating novel.

The fact that it’s loosely based on a true story, the fact that a white man had a big enough pair to write this novel, and the fact that he received a ton of backlash for doing so, make this book full of intrigue.

Last week, I mentioned that William Styron, as a white author, attempts to get inside of the head of Nat Turner, an African American slave from the 1830s, a “character” who actually exists.

When the novel was released in 1968, The Confessions received a lot of praise. The novel was a best-seller and won the Pulitzer Prize. Styron was even well received at a historically black college. He told The New York Times: Read more

Who Needs Pictures In Kids’ Books Anyway?

My 4 year old is going to love this book. In fact, I’m placing my order today.

What a great way to encourage kids to read. It’s goofy and immature, but these are kids! And they’re learning to read!

So what exactly is this book with no pictures? It’s a new kids’ book from BJ Novak, our favorite intern from The Office. 

It’s just freakin’ brilliant. But I’ve got to work on my voice inflection before I read it to my son.

Here’s a promotional video of Novak reading the kids book. Be warned: It’s pretty awesome!

You can order it on Amazon.  Read more

The Nat Turner Story In 5 Minutes

Honestly guys, The Confessions of Nat Turner is taking me a lot longer to read than I would like.

That has nothing to do with the novel’s quality, but life has just been a little hectic lately. I hope to be able to review the novel next week.

In the meantime, I don’t have much to say today. So I’ll let this little 5-minute overly dramatic video from The History Channel do the talking.

This will give you a good overview of the true story upon which the novel is based. Read more

Does An Author’s Personal Life Influence You?

Some of the most commented on posts at 101 Books are the post in which I ask a simple question. We usually have a lot of great discussion in the comments.

So with that in mind, I thought I’d make this a weekly thing. From now on, every Monday I will feature the “Monday Question” on the blog. It will be a simple, straightforward book-related question for you guys. I’ll give you some of my initial thoughts and then turn the floor over to you in the comments. Hopefully, it will provoke some new thoughts and entertaining discussions.

So let’s get started.

The first Monday Question is simply this: Read more

9 Times An Editor Would’ve Helped

Editors are my favorite.

They are the unsung heroes of the content world. Writers get all the credit, but editors make the content sing.

If someone ever tells you that editing isn’t that important, or that anyone can do it, or that you don’t really need to hire an editor for your article or book, then you should know this: You’ve just received the worse piece of writing advice in the history of writing advice.

Everyone needs an editor. Even the President of the United States.

Need proof? Here are just a few of the many times using an editor would have been highly beneficial.  Read more

Can A White Author Get Inside a Black Character’s Head?

I tread lightly entering today’s topic, but it’s one that I can’t help but ask.

And it’s this exact topic that fueled a lot of the controversy surrounding William Styron when he won the Pulitzer for The Confessions of Nat Turner in 1968.

It’s simply this: What would an older, southern white man in the 1960s know about the mindset of a young black slave in the 1830s?

Remember, Styron is writing in the first person. The narrator IS Nat Turner, the leader of a slave rebellion. To write from that point of view had to be an unbelievably difficult task. He’s simply telling the story as an outside narrator, or even a Nick Carraway-style observer. Styron, as Nat, is the narrator.

Styron explained his thought process in a piece written by The Library of Congress: Read more

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