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Posts tagged ‘101 books blog’

The 2nd Annual Literary Trick Or Treat!

It’s that time of year when I bow down to the blogging gods who tell me to create seasonally-themed blog content.

Last year, I was hesitant before finally caving to their demands. And, today, I return to the scene of the crime.

It’s the 2nd Annual Literary Trick or Treat!

Your least favorite seasonal blog post returns, badder and worser than ever! Below, I’ve given 10 fairly popular opinions about books, literature, writing, blogging and the like. Then I’ll tell you whether or not I think said opinion is good (treat!) or bad (trick!). It’s wonderfully clever, isn’t it?

So let’s begin: Read more

Next Up: Lucky Jim

I’m ready to move on from the intensity of The Confessions of Nat Turner and read something a little lighter. Enter Lucky Jim.

Lucky Jim was written by Kingsley Amis, and it portrays the sad but comical life of an English professor in post-war England.

The character of Jim is based on Amis himself, as well as influenced by his friendship with the poet Philip Larkin.

Some quick facts about Lucky Jim and Kingsley Amis: Read more

Book #75: The Confessions Of Nat Turner

As you probably know by now, The Confessions of Nat Turner is loosely based on a true story. And I use “loosely” in the true sense of the word. Very few facts were known about Nat Turner’s life, so William Styron took a lot of liberty in filling in those gaps.

The story is about a massive slave revolt that took place in 1831 in Virginia. Nat Turner was an extremely smart, self-educated, seemingly mild-mannered, polite slave who, after years of abuse, felt led by God to eventually murder as many white people as possible. He recruited a few dozen other slaves and eventually killed 55 white people over the course of two days.

The story is riveting, and Styron is creative in how he approaches telling it. He jumps back and forth between Nat’s confession to his lawyer and the events Nat is describing—his childhood, the different slaveowners he worked under, his “vision” from God, and ultimately the details of recruiting other slaves and the rebellion itself. Read more

Paper Books, eBooks, or Audio Books?

For this week’s Monday Question, I thought I’d yet again dive into the controversial waters of ebooks versus traditional books, with a twist.

If you could only “read” books in one format for the rest of your life, would you choose paper books, ebooks, or audio books? Why? Read more

5 Ways To Generate Blog Post Ideas

This marks my 954th post on 101 Books.

Four years ago, I would’ve laughed if you told me I would publish that many posts on this blog. How could I possibly write 954 posts about a list of books?

But you’d be surprised at how relatively easy it is to come up with topics once you make a habit out of coming up with topics. I’ve figured out a few ways to build brainstorming into my everyday life, without taking up a chunk of time I don’t have.

That’s really helped me generate new ideas for the blog, so I thought I’d share a few of my tips with you guys. If you have a blog, maybe you might find one or two worth your time. Read more

The Praise And Criticism Of William Styron

The Confessions of Nat Turner is just a fascinating novel.

The fact that it’s loosely based on a true story, the fact that a white man had a big enough pair to write this novel, and the fact that he received a ton of backlash for doing so, make this book full of intrigue.

Last week, I mentioned that William Styron, as a white author, attempts to get inside of the head of Nat Turner, an African American slave from the 1830s, a “character” who actually exists.

When the novel was released in 1968, The Confessions received a lot of praise. The novel was a best-seller and won the Pulitzer Prize. Styron was even well received at a historically black college. He told The New York Times: Read more

Who Needs Pictures In Kids’ Books Anyway?

My 4 year old is going to love this book. In fact, I’m placing my order today.

What a great way to encourage kids to read. It’s goofy and immature, but these are kids! And they’re learning to read!

So what exactly is this book with no pictures? It’s a new kids’ book from BJ Novak, our favorite intern from The Office. 

It’s just freakin’ brilliant. But I’ve got to work on my voice inflection before I read it to my son.

Here’s a promotional video of Novak reading the kids book. Be warned: It’s pretty awesome!

You can order it on Amazon.  Read more

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