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Posts from the ‘Reading Updates’ Category

Miss Brodie: “Education is leading out of knowledge.”

In The Prime of Miss Brodie, the protagonist (Miss Brodie) is a school teacher with a different take on education.

She has a few select female students she’s bonded with, and she applies some of her teaching principles to them. As word of Miss Brodie’s unusual techniques begin to spread around the school, she explains her educational style to some of her students.  Read more

And The Next Five Novels Will Be…

Thanks for voting on Friday and over the weekend, everyone.

Here’s how the results turned out.

The next 5 novels will be (listed by votes received, not the order in which I’ll be reading them): Read more

This Is The Most Vile Passage I’ve Ever Read

And we’re back to talking about Naked Lunch, perhaps the most uncomfortable, steaming pile of dog poo novel I’ve ever read.

With hesitation, I want to give you an idea of what I’m talking about when I say this book is incredibly difficult to read.

It’s one thing for me to say that, but it’s another thing for you to read some of it yourself. Instead of block quoting the passage below, like usual, and inviting all sorts of creepo internet traffic, I thought I’d simply take a photo of the passage.

Here it is. Start from the top to get the full sicko affect, and proceed with extreme caution. Read more

With Naked Lunch, I Might Have Finally Met My Match

It’s happened to all of us.

A novel makes a “best of” list, maybe like Time Magazine’s—the critics love it—some of our friends say it’s great and some online reviews say it’s a good read.

Then we start reading the novel, and we’re like, Um, I don’t get it. But there’s something in the back of our mind saying, I’m supposed to like this novel! What am I missing?

I’m there right now. In reading Naked Lunch, I might have met my match, and I’m not sure what to do. Read more

“To crave and to have are as like as a thing and its shadow.”

So I wasn’t crazy about the opening paragraph in Housekeeping, as I explained recently.

But as I mentioned in that same post, Marilynne Robinson’s writing style is much less choppy, much more poetic, throughout the rest of the book.

Almost all the characters in Housekeeping have a great sense of loneliness and longing. It’s a melancholy novel.

Here’s one of the more beautifully written, poetic passages from the novel: Read more

Here’s An Example of Commas Gone Wild

Y’all know I’m big on opening sentences. The first page, the first chapter, of a novel really sets the tone.

So, when I came across this doozy at the beginning of Housekeeping, I must admit that my eyes started to cross. Read more

“A Fragrant of Forgotten Experience”

A House for Mr. Biswas is full of beautiful passages.

But this one might be the best: Read more

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