Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Book Recaps’ Category

Book #72: The Lord Of The Rings

Wow. It “only” took me about two months, but I’ve finally completed the epic known as The Lord of the Rings.

As I’ve said before, I had only read about half the novel before inexplicably putting it down many years ago without finishing. What was I thinking?

The Lord of the Rings is, quite possibly, the best novel ever written.

I don’t say that ironically, and I’m not saying that to troll. I really mean it. But, of course, as is everything on this blog, that’s just my opinion—which is reflected in my rankings.

You know the story, right? Read more

Book #71: The Death Of The Heart

Call me old-fashioned, but I’m not the kind of guy who enjoys reading teenage love stories on my beach vacation, which will be here in a few weeks.

So it’s wonderful timing that I’m wrapping up The Death of the Heart today—just in time to leave it at home when I go on vacation. Won’t The Lord of the Rings be the perfect read for the beach?

I took way too long to finish this book. At first, I thought the novel would be a slog—the opening didn’t exactly give me warm and fuzzies about enjoying The Death of the Heart. But it improved. The novel gets better. Elizabeth Bowen is obviously in her element writing this book. Everything about the story feels natural and unforced. Read more

Book #70: Red Harvest

Red Harvest is a great book.

It’s the type of novel you can sit down and read in a few hours and enjoy every minute. The story is fast-paced and strong and Dashiell Hammett’s writing is on point.

If you haven’t read any of my previous posts about Red Harvest (see them all here), here’s a quick story summary:

The Continental Op is a private detective hired by a millionaire in small-town Montana. This millionaire, Elihu Willsson, wants the Continental Op to come in and clean up a lot of the organized crime activity, including a dirty police force, that has been brutalizing the town for months.

Once the Op gets in town, guess what? You guessed it…all hell breaks loose. Read more

Book #69: Possession

Let me tell you about Possession.

In fact, I’ll give you a quick outline of the novel in case you were considering reading it. No real spoilers, but here’s the breakdown: Read more

Book #68: Their Eyes Were Watching God

Here is my one word, highly academic, response to Their Eyes Were Watching God:

Wow.

Five years from now, if you ask me about some of the books I’ve read from the Time list, I’m sure there will be many that I’ve forgotten about. That’s what the blog is for—to help me remember.

But this is one of those novels that I won’t forget. Everything about Their Eyes Were Watching God is memorable—the story, the characters, the settings, the writing—oh, the writing.

Zora Neale Hurston’s writing is so ridiculously good, and the story itself is so strong, I wonder how this woman hasn’t been given more praise than she has. How did she not get “rediscovered” until the 1970s? What’s wrong with us?

Read more

Book #67: Money

Money is one of the wildest novels I’ve ever read. Pardon the literary cliché, but it’s a roller coaster ride from start to finish.

The novel is such a romp that I don’t even know where to start reviewing it.

Let’s just say that Money is told from the point of view of the classic unreliable narrator. John Self is a raging alcoholic. In fact, it wouldn’t be out of line to say that he is drunk through probably 90% of the novel.

He battles other addictions, like sex and cigarettes. At one point, Self even says, “Unless I specifically inform you otherwise, assume I am always smoking another cigarette.”

The man is a narcissistic basket case. He’s a jerk, a man of terrible morals, but Martin Amis almost, almost, almost makes you like him because of his sense of humor and self-awareness.

Read more

Book #66: The Day Of The Locust

I’m tired of reading books about depressed, alcoholic, hopeless twenty-somethings.

I’m just tired of it, man.

I get it. I really do. Your 20s is probably the most volatile, unpredictable decade of your life. It’s a time period that’s easy to write about because it connects with so many people.

We’ve all been there trying to figure out what to do with our lives, trying to figure out what that girl we like is thinking, trying to figure out if we really hate our job enough to quit and pursue something new. For some people, trying not to be drunk all the time.

So I understand why authors like Nathanael West feel led to write about this time period. And I understand why Hemingway wrote about it in The Sun Also Rises or Malcolm Lowry in Under The Volcano or Jack Kerouac in On The Road. But when you put all these books on a list and read them relatively close to each other, the reading gets cumbersome.

Read more

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 32,253 other followers

%d bloggers like this: