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Memorable Lines From Brideshead Revisited

Brideshead Revisited is one of those novels that’s filled with memorable passages and witty one-liners.

One minute you’ll be reading a reflective passage from Charles Ryder, the narrator. The next you’ll be reading some witty one-liners from his alcoholic socialite friend, Sebastian.

The novel has so many good quotes that I thought I’d pull out a few and share with you guys today. Take a look:

“I should like to bury something precious in every place where I’ve been happy and then, when I’m old and ugly and miserable, I could come back and dig it up and remember.”

“Sometimes, I feel the past and the future pressing so hard on either side that there’s no room for the present at all.”

“The trouble with modern education is you never know how ignorant people are. With anyone over fifty you can be fairly confident what’s been taught and what’s been left out. But these young people have such an intelligent, knowledgeable surface, and then the crust suddenly breaks and you look down into depths of confusion you didn’t know existed.”

“O God, make me good, but not yet.”

“[Change is] the only evidence of life.”

“No one could really hate a saint, could they? They can’t really hate God either. When they want to Hate Him and His saints they have to find something like themselves and pretends it’s God and hate that.”

I’m digging this novel.

I don’t think it’s going to be a top-10er in my rankings, but I believe, by the time I’ve finished reading it, I’ll be happy to recommend Brideshead Revisited.

Very curious to see where this one goes.

James Joyce Was A Copyeditor’s Nightmare

Take a look at this. Holy crap!

I’m not sure if this was a copyeditor having a nightmare with Joyce’s original draft, or if it was Joyce editing a later draft. Either way, let’s all thank God for track changes in Word.

I can’t imagine working like this. Might as well be reading Greek.

joyce

Source: Rupert Thomson via Twitter

Time’s 100 Novels Ranked By Amazon Sales

One of my favorite parts of Amazon is the Amazon sales rank. It’s just a quick gauge of how the public generally receives a book.

While sales don’t always indicate a novel’s quality or critical reception (see Twilight), they’re sometimes a decent indicator. So because I have tons of free time (I don’t, really), I thought I’d dig up the Amazon sales ranking for all of the Time Magazine 100 novels. Then, throw them all in a spreadsheet and see how they rank.

Let’s take a look at how the Time 100 novels rank by sales on Amazon. Note: The book’s overall ranking is the number to the right. Read more

A Look Inside Castle Howard

What exactly is Castle Howard, you ask?

It’s the castle chosen to depict the Brideshead castle in both the mini-series and cinematic versions of Brideshead Revisited. And, as you can see, it’s beautiful.

The castle is located in North Yorkshire, England and has been the actual private residence of the Carlisle branch of the Howard family for more than 300 years.

Construction began in 1699 and took more than 100 years to complete, using the design by Sir John Vanbrugh. The entire estate covers 13,000 acres.  Read more

This Might Be The Best Ever New York Times Correction

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First of all, let’s just go ahead and say that R.A. Dickey is the coolest professional athlete on the planet, right?

Of note, R.A. Dickey is actually a pitcher (famous for his knuckleball), so he doesn’t even bat that often. How many pitchers name their bats? That’s great.

Now I’m thinking about naming my keyboard “Needle” in honor of Arya Stark on Game of Thrones. I pierce you with my words!

HT to Anne Helen Peterson

Brideshead Revisited On The Big (And Small) Screen

If it’s true that you can tell a good novel by how many times it’s been adapted onto the screen (is it true?), then Brideshead Revisited is a pretty darn good novel.

Let’s take a look at the two most famous adaptions of Waugh’s novel. Read more

11 Classic Novels Reimagined With Clickbait Titles

You’re familiar with clickbait titles, right? Upworthy is famous for them. BuzzFeed uses them, and they’re pretty much all over the internet.

So what if classic novels were renamed with clickbait titles? Yeah, I know, that’s a terrible idea, but I’m going to have a little fun with it anyway.

Here’s how I might rename these classic novels using clickbait: (HT to The Millions for this idea) Read more

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